good deal Quick-change drill/countersink

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whit3rd wrote:

I have at least 1000 screws in my shop the moment. Some are bronze, a few are stainless steel, most are plain old steel.
Nary a single one has a bugle head. That's because I used up all my drywall screws the last time I messed with drywall.
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On Tue, 15 Dec 2015 05:31:06 -0500

i did not notice my drywall screws had a bugle head
is it considered a bugle head if the edges are rounded
i guess there are varying degrees of bugles
i have some cabinet screws that definitely have a bugle head
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On Tuesday, December 15, 2015 at 9:20:48 AM UTC-8, Electric Comet wrote:

That's where the problem lies. If you have a machine screw with flat-head, the inch-sizes take an 82 degree conical countersink (and metric sizes take 90 degree conical countersink). In wood screws of flat-head and oval-head types, it's (presumably) always 82 degrees. So, in assembling a furniture item, if you have the proper countersink for the screw head, that head bottoms against the work all at once, and the clever craftsperson on the other end of the screwdriver can tension it properly. If the bugle-head makes contact, it'll be first at the small 'bugle' flare, or maybe at the rim alone, but never on the full face of the countersunk hole. Because it's not the right SHAPE to contact the full cut face of the countersunk hole.
The only way to tighten the screw is to crush some wood at the head.
That's not optimal.
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On Tue, 15 Dec 2015 13:56:28 -0800 (PST)

but i have to research what bugle head means because i am a bit confused on that still
my countersink worked fine for the small bugle cabinet screws i use they are cheap black screws probably #6
it starts to sound like a countersink mismatch a bugle head needs the right countersink and so does the convetional head
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On Thursday, December 17, 2015 at 1:44:20 PM UTC-8, Electric Comet wrote:

The 'bugle head' is intended to crush the paper surface and imbed slightly when driven in sheetrock/drywall/gypsum board materials, so the surface can be spackled flat. Some wood screws for trim are 'small head' types, and apparently are intended to wedge into a predrilled hole (often the tip of the screw is a drill) in wood or fake-wood trim boards..
Neither the 'bugle head' nor the 'trim head/ small head"' are well-specified as to shape, so I see no easy way to countersink for those. They hold well in wood, and are sold as wood screws, but one ought not to use them for cabinetry (nor, for that matter, for mounting door hinges).
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

In at least one case ("Cortex") a "trim head" screw comes with a bit having a marker band so that when the marker contacts the surface it is sunk to the right depth in "fake-wood" trim boards and comes with a plug of the same material as the board that can be set almost invisibly with a single hammer blow (not with two mind you--if you don't get it all the way down with the first one it's buggered enough that it won't ever seat right).
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On Mon, 14 Dec 2015 20:02:19 -0800 (PST)

i wonder if the tool companies source out parts like this or they really do make them
i got a set of ryobi forstner bits that have been good

have noticed that too so far found if i get the countersink just right it conceals fine
still have old screws that i have got from craigslist or fle markets or wherever i come across them got a whole bin of nails and screws free just for taking them although have not had a need for duplex nails
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On 12/14/2015 4:14 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

This is more expensive but seems more useful.
http://www.rockler.com/rockler-insty-drive-18-piece-self-centering-countersink-set?sid=V2950&utm_source=bronto&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Image+-+Rockler+18-Pc.+Self-Centering+%26+Countersink+Bit+Set&utm_content=Holiday+Shipping+Deadline+Is+Coming+-+Get+Your+Gift+Orders+In !&utm_campaign1615_b_r_HolidayShipping_Global_V2950
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On 12/16/2015 8:37 AM, Leon wrote:

I have a similar package from Rockler for self centered drilling pilot holes for cabinet hinges and drawer slide screws. Hard to beat.
Both Makita and DeWalt make the QuikChange driver/countersink drill bit cheaper than LV's ... had them both for years and they're still good to go. The Makita's are a little easier to use, and not as bulky.
Love my Fuller stuff best of all.
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