Good Books on DIY tools


I have decided to start doing a bit of DIY but to tell the truth I'm sixty+ and yes, I know it's a bit late to try and learn something new? I bought some power tools namely; a rooter, power plane, 10" table saw, circular saw, belt sander, cordless drill, hand chisels etc. I was thinking of getting a nail gun, and a bench grinder but I only have a 6ft X 8ft Groungsman Apex Double Door Shed to work in. A previous thread I put in this NG suggested That I put paving stones outside the front entrance which I thought was a good idea, therefor I could use most of the tools outside (weather permitting as I live in Scotland, Glasgow) How should I start my new hobby? I would like to buy a book that would show me how to use the rooter as there is a lot of bits for different jobs. How do I set-up the shed and what is the best sort of job to start with? Thanks for any advice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

advice.
It sounds like you're looking for something to make just so you can use a particular tool, (the router in this case). As a start, I'd suggest you reverse the order and find something you want to make using the tools you have. You've got enough tools on hand to take you a long way. What do you like to do in your spare time, (before you became interested in woodworking)?
With that pastime in mind, then think about what you could construct to make it more enjoyable. Go do some window shopping to get some ideas. Start small and work you way up. Sure, pick up some books, maybe something about beginner woodworking projects. If you can't think of what to make, then tells us what you like to do and solicit some ideas from the readers here for something to build.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi Scottie,
I started woodwork last year at the age of 63. I bought the cheapest of everything (at Machine Mart or B&Q) as I needed them and am really enjoying myself. So far I've made two cots for new grandchildren, a wardrobe, a chest of drawers and new garage doors. I have roughly the same tools as you and the only thing I would like is a band-saw but they are a bit expensive. I mostly work outside, though I suppose my weather on the south coast is a bit better than yours !
Bob Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would suggest you start with something that yeilds a useful item and does not rush into precise joinery. How about making a pair of adirondack chairs? Uses regular, faily inexpensive lumber. Here are free metric plans - http://www.buildeazy.com/fp_adirondackchair.html

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scottie:
Don't worry about the age thing. I know that a lot of the older folks in my woodworking club were restrained by several factors that kept them from starting in woodworking until later in life. Some were:
1) Too much debt from family and kids 2) No time due to family and kids 3) No interest due to other activities 4) No patience or appreciation for different aspects of the craft(s)
I know a guy here that just started wood turning in his middle sixties and he is now in his early seventies. Free of the above mentioned problems, he is one of the best turners in the club.
To get the most out of what you are doing, find a club to join and get with the members. Most are glad to have new blood and interested members.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scottie, do a search in www.amazon.co.uk Just key in "router", "DIY" etc. Plenty of books covering all aspects of WW. Also try www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums for more UK based WW.
Rgds
Noel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scottie, I just recently picked up woodworking as a hobby too, and don't have many tools. One book that I've enjoyed very much is called
"The Complete Book of Woodworking: Detailed Plans for More Than 40 Fabulous Projects" available on Amazon.com. I didn't see it on amazon.co.uk, but you might be able to find it somewhere else. This book was very informative and interesting, and was a great guide to starting out woodworking. I've heard very good things about Router books by Bill Hylton also, but don't own any. Good luck with your new hobby!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 May 2005 10:55:10 GMT, "<<Scottie>>"
Woodworking or DIY ? Or both?

Stop buying tools. Buy some timber instead, and a few books.
Tools are sold by people who want to sell tools. They're not interested in whether they get used, or used well - they're just trying to shift them. So back off on the tool thing - it's a good way to spend a _lot_ of money. In a small shed they also eat up storage space.
Books. Go to the library first, because UK libraries are still pretty good on woodworking books. You can spend a _fortune_ on books!
Here's a rubbish list I really must tidy up some day. http://codesmiths.com/shed/books/woodworking.htm
The "workshop 3" (Workshop Book, Workbench Book, Toolbox Book) are good ones to borrow soonish. You should also buy the Ian Kirby saw book (because you already have a table saw). Tage Frid wouldn't hurt, even if you have to buy it new.
Take a look on eBay for woodworking books. You're after Joyce's "The Technique of Furniture Making" because it often comes up cheaply and particularly for old out-of-print books; "Planecraft" and anything by Charles Hayward or Bob Wearing. Any of the Fine Woodworking "collected volumes" too. Avoid Time Life, Reader's Digest, anything on paint or finishing, or anything that smacks of "Changing Rooms".
Don't be afraid of furniture books from the "antique" end of things either. A good "History of deisgn styles in the 18th/19th/20th century" is a good read and will give you lots of ideas too. I'm doing some Tudor radiator cabinets just now - and why shouldn't I use a 400 year old design style for them ?
Other useful books are tool catalogues. Axminster, Tilgear, Screwfix for starters.
Pricelists from your local timberyards too. Shop around on timberyards - it's your biggest cost and most UK ones aren't very good. My local guys: www.interestingtimbers.co.uk might give you some ideas on pricing.
Magazines. Go into Smiths and get copies of Fine Woodworking, Furniture and Cabinet Making and Good Woodworking. You'll probably find Good Woodworking the best read at first, but get at least one copy of the others, just for inspiration (FWW is the only woodie mag I subscribe too)

Pat Warner's web site.
Routers really cry out for router tables, These are easy to make (stupidly expensive to buy). A rolling "plywood cube" router table will store away neatly and provide storage beneath it too.

You put a bench in it. This is your main tool of all - don't underestimate it. 100 bucks from Happy Shopper (Northern Tools) isn't good enough. Axminster's cheapies are more like it. Or build your own - 2x4 leg framing, lots of bracing and a top of doubled 3/4" ply with 4mm MDF top skin against wear. Boxing the back and sides with 1/2" ply makes it nice and rigid and turns it into a tool cupboard. Then learn to make framed doors for the front. Buy a S/H cast iron woodworking vice to go on it too - the country is full of these things (usually by Record or Paramo) and they're not expensive, so long as you don't have to post them.
If you're at the DIY end of things, a Workmate is a handy thing to have too, especially with that flagged outdoor space. You can put the table saw / router table onto wheeled trolleys and use them outdoors too. A table saw needs a big space around it, especially for working plywood sheets.
I'm a big fan of trestles for outdoor work too. Make a pair, and make them so they either nest or fold for storage (shed ceiling, on chains).

Short ones that make something where you don't think afterwards "Why the hell did I make _that_?" You're only learning yet, don't expect too much. But make something that you can get finished.
If you read too many copies of Good Woodworking, you'll find yourself making a dovecot (doves are evil things) or a decorative garden ziggurat. Project guides that lead you through the whole process are a good thing, but if you don't look wide enough, you'll find you've made something that you really don't want afterwards. Why _does_ my Dad have a half-completed windmill in his workshop ?
There's also the Making Things for the Workshop trap to fall into. Mainly a problem for metalworkers, it's all too easy to turn "I could make myself that router table rather than buying it" into "I fancy making another router table, just to try out this new idea". Making what you need is good. Having the workshop itself become your reason for making anything is bad.
There's a great deal of woodworking you can do. Even in a tiny workshop, you can fit a hobby into it. Some people take up turning, or fly-rod making. Personally I like timber-framed barns, which also take up little space (you do it on site, someone else's site). Don't commit yourself just yet (stop buying those tools), try a few things out, see what appeals to you.
If you're building simple fitted-in furniture around the house, then we;'re talking plywood or MDF and biscuit joints. Now this is good stuff - it keeps spouses happy and it gets the telly off the floor, but when you've built one MDF cube with a door on, you've pretty much built them all. Well, maybe not all http://codesmiths.com/shed/furniture/cabinets/swarf /
Try reading uk.d-i-y too
--
Cats have nine lives, which is why they rarely post to Usenet.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.