Gluing up a turning block

I am probably making too much out of this, but it is my first time and all that.
I am gluing up a turning block; sandwiching spalted maple between wenge. What glue to use? Is PVA adequate, or polyurethane, or epoxy?
Yesterday I turned a plate that was simply taped onto the faceplate; so I expect PVA will do fine, but I would rather benefit from other's experience than my own.
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Toller wrote:

You're right, you're making too much of it. PVA is stronger than the wood itself, especially when you have such a large glued surface.
DonkeyHody "We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it - and stop there; lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove-lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove-lid again---and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore." - Mark Twain
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DonkeyHody wrote:

the source of your worry. I think that given the large glue area, you'll be fine if you plane or sand immediately before gluing.
DonkeyHody "The cheapest things in life are free."
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PVA is fine- but one thing you need to keep in mind is that it's going to need to fully cure. The first time I did this, I let it sit for about an hour, and it delaminated on the lathe. Better to let it sit with the clamps on for more like 24 hours.
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"Do not stress joints for 24 hours." [instructions on the back of the Titebond II bottle]
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Wed, 15 Nov 2006 15:22:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Yeah, but I was in a rush to play with my new toy, and I didn't have any firewood or suitable branches around. Furniture is usually all right to continue with after the glue has tacked, so I was foolishly using that rule-of-thumb. Hence, the warning/reminder.
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As others said PVA is fine ... but... between the very stable wenge and the less stable maple you may get some creeping, and if you end up with a fine reflective finish you may have a slight glue line. Epoxy or cascamite would be better for that reason, but they may blunt your turning tools a bit more.
Tim w
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glue; but I don't find that for sale. Is it not used in the US?
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Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue.
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white powder, mixed with water and sets rock hard. Has been used afaik for 50yrs for boat building, airframes, joinery, but probably old-fashioned now.
tim W
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On Wed, 15 Nov 2006 23:10:33 GMT, "Tim W"

You'll almost certainly get a very fine glue line- but given the huge color difference between maple and wenge, it won't be worth noting- at least IMO.
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