Gluing plywood to base cabinet side

I have a sink base kitchen cabinet going in the basement. I have cut up some 1/4" thick plywood to put on the sides and toekick. Its particleboard from the factory. Problem is how to glue it to the cabinet. Festool rail guided circular saw worked wonders cutting the plywood.
Option 1: Use yellow woodworking glue. Problem is getting pressure on the plywood. Sink base sides are 34" x 23". Sink base is 5 feet wide. So I do not have long enough clamps to use cauls. I've thought about putting bags of cat litter on top of the plywood to weight it down. 200 pounds or so. Not sure it will be enough pounds per square inch of pressure. The plywood is also not perfectly flat. It has some waves and twists and bows in it.
Option 2. Contact adhesive. I think it will work with plywood as well as it does with plastic laminate.
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On 1/27/10 9:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

1 vote for that. If you can, cut over-sized and trim with router.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Jan 27, 10:39 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Contact is a good choice. Get a cheap roller, do both sides, after it is dry to the touch, use some sticks to suspend the panel over the cabinet side, and remove those sticks one at the time. Then use a 6 x 6 inch slab of something as a pressure pad and hit it with a dead-blow all over the surface.
Oh, and did I detect some drive-by suction, eh, Festool boy?
:-)
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I gotta admit it was a pleasure using the Festool saw and 5 foot or so rail to cut up the plywood. It was just so accurate and easy to make the cuts. Trimming just a 1/16" or so off to make the plywood fit better was just so easy. Table saw would have worked too. Still have not used the Festool tools enough to justify the cost but maybe someday.
I'll stop by Home Depot on the way home from work tomorrow evening and pick up a quart of contact adhesive. I use cardboard to keep the two pieces coated with adhesive apart. Then just slide out the cardboard an inch or so at a time and push the pieces together to stick the adhesive. Works better than a bunch of sticks to keep the parts separated.
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On Jan 28, 8:38 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Just don't tear the cardboard and get some of it stuck in between. Dowels is what we use in a production shop.
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"Robatoy" wrote:
Just don't tear the cardboard and get some of it stuck in between. Dowels is what we use in a production shop. ------------------------------------------ Yep.
Lew
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On Wed, 27 Jan 2010 19:39:16 -0800 (PST), the infamous
following:

Option 2 is how I'd stick it. It's less fun than construction adhesive but it flattens the thin stuff better.
Here's how I'd do that for myself:
1) Cut the sheet oversize for later triming with a router.
2) Prefinish the one side to diminish errant glue spots during the next step.
3) Coat both sides with adhesive, let it sit 5-15 minutes or so, depending on the type and mfgr's instructions (I prefer solvent type, but it's getting harder to find,)
4) Stick it in place, carefully, and set with a 2x4 and a rubber mallet, smackin' it all over the place.
5) Trim with a router and finish cutting the ends with my ryoba or azebiki (if it's in place and there are walls nearby.)
6) File sawn ends smooth.
7) Go back and smack it with the tubafore and mallet to make sure I got it all down flat.
8) Sand and smooth with 320 grit (150 or 220 for paint).
9) Install final (or 3 handrubbed) coat(s) of finish.
10) Now take a picture.
-- It is in his pleasure that a man really lives; it is from his leisure that he constructs the true fabric of self. -- Agnes Repplier
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wrote:

Yup
Good idea.

That's the tricky part. I always go a little dryer rather than tacky. It should barely leave a finger print, but it should leave one.

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On Thu, 28 Jan 2010 07:03:46 -0800 (PST), the infamous Robatoy

--snip--
What's your reason for going drier? Do you feel that it sticks better, or is it just a bit easier to work with?
-- It is in his pleasure that a man really lives; it is from his leisure that he constructs the true fabric of self. -- Agnes Repplier
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I have added lots of short but wide 1/4" bead board panels to all of the walls in our bathroom. Typically they were 30 inches tall. I used construction adhesive specifically intended for the use of installing paneling w/o nails. Read the instructions as IIRC you apply the adhesive, set the panel in place for a few moments and then remove for a predetermined period of time, and then reapply the panel. Still working in 6 years later.
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On Jan 27, 10:39 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Conbond, router.
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On Thu, 28 Jan 2010 16:45:24 -0700, Father Haskell wrote (in article

I tried #1 (yellow galoo) and it bonded poorly to the 'pre-finished' particle board (I figured that would happen...). Anyhoo, contact cement worked wonderfully putting bead board panels on standard hollow core interior doors in a room remodel (the 'gel' weldwood brand).
-Bruce
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