Gluing dowels

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Firstly, thanks for the tip about flattening one side of the dowels. That made things much easier. And I thought of a very simple way to do it efficiently:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qtk7gAC0uts&feature=youtu.be

The "jig" probably took all of a minute to make. As an added bonus, my fingers are just as long as before I started. :)
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On 8/13/2014 8:36 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Good Idea but you probably only need to make 2 passes at the most. You are only providing a passage for air and glue to escape.
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On 8/12/2014 3:00 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

No need to get fancy. Sometimes all you need is to squeeze them slightly with a pair of pliers. With the right pliers you can even get a groove of sorts for the glue to escape.
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Clamps work better than hammers. IME, YMMV, HTH, HAND. Et cetera.
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On 8/12/2014 3:39 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Huh. But you do miss out on the psychic benefits of hitting something.
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"Greg Guarino" wrote:

Epoxy is your friend, 25 Min @ 77F pot life.
Lew
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I saw a tip in an old WOOD magazine where a fellow drilled a hole in the end of a piece of stock to hold a dowel. He then used the bandsaw to cut a groove in the dowel.
I'd probably go for the groove and stop, as it would seem to be much faster to make.
Puckdropper
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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message

Instead of using something like Titebond, which is undoubtedly swelling the dowels during the assembly time (they're designed to do that, when used with a water-based glue), consider using something like Nexabond, which is not water-based and will not cause swelling in the dowels.
Tom
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On 8/12/2014 11:48 PM, tdacon wrote:

thing I wonder is about squeeze-out. I know (sort-of) how to deal with it with Titebond, but epoxy, nexabond, polyurethane?
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On 8/13/2014 9:47 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Can't hurt at all. ;)
That said, It's not usually the swelling of the dowels that is the problem - and it's biscuits that are purposely designed to swell, not necessarily dowels.
AAMOF, with the initial coating (and providing the piston effect is mitigated) you may notice a slight lubrication effect at first ... until the glue starts to set.
Also, you may also have this same sticky problem, from exceeding the open time slightly, when gluing mortise and tenon joints that are sloppy enough that the piston effect is not an issue.
IOW, and with most hardwood dowels, I question, from experience, that it is water based glue at the root of the problem.
Non water based glues, like Nexabond are great for smaller and/or special applications, but for gluing most furniture and cabinet projects, prepare to dent the hell out of your budget, and possibly still not solve the issue if you exceed the open time.
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Clamps beat mallets everytime.

Epoxy takes a _long_ time to set up. So does plastic resin glue (Weldwood). So does resorcinol.

You could use clamps to assemble, then put it in your jig to square it up.
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So use a pocket knife. Or a chisel. Or a rasp.
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RE: Subject
Got a vice?
Got a 10" Flat Bastard File?
The rest is an exercise in flattening.
Lew
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On 8/13/2014 9:59 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Greg Guarino" wrote:

So did I.
Lew
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In the time before time, before biscuits and Dominoes there reigned the dow el.
We made our own dowels many a time as they could be hard to get. Without a thickness planer, it was too hard to make great fitting splines quickly, b ut you could take your calipers and find rod stock that would work somewher e and buy a couple of sticks that would last a long time. If the stock was too large, we simply put a piece in a drill chuck and "reduced it" with a piece of 80gr. You would be surprised how well that worked.
For striations, I came up with my own method. I drilled several holes in a straight line from edge to edge (not lengthwise) and cut the board in two down the middle of the holes. I put the dowels I had cut to length into my holding jigs and just used masking tape to hold them into the concave cut o uts in the board. I could easily get two lengthwise air/glue relief cuts o n each dowel by just touching it to a band saw blade, since I only needed a bout 1/32" deep.
Using a piece of 1x4 scrap, I could about 5 dowels per board half, and the dowels were cut to length and ready to go when I pulled the tape off. This really just took >>a few minutes<< to make a bunch. The beauty is that yo u aren't confined to one size of dowel and this method will work on any siz e wood rod you find that matches up to your drill bits. When I made larger , custom dowels, I used a piece of 2X6 for the holding jig and cut 3/4 dowe ls from rod stock. On these (used in making/repairing doors) I would rotat e the dowel stock and cut a couple more striations on the opposing side of the first cuts.
That all came to me one day while in the shop and I couldn't get the dowels I wanted. Never seen anyone do it that way... but I can testify it works like a champ.
Robert
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