Gluing ceramic tiles to particleboard... which glue?

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Hi,
I want to put a ceramic tile top over a particleboard base. Which glue should I use to stick the tile to the wood?
Thanks in advance
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Faustino Dina
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On Sat, 6 Dec 2003 15:13:50 -0600, "Faustino Dina"

Almost anything. Tiles are porous (on the back), which makes them easy to glue.
Personally I use normal tile adhesive, same as you'd use to stick them to a wall. Grout afterwards with the standard tile grout.
I've seen others use white PVA (the cheap builder's grade, not woodworker's, because it needs to be thick and you use plenty of it). I've even seen polyurethane glue used.
I'd tend to use plywood rather than particle board. Particle board is prone to sagging with a permanent "set" under load, and it aslo hates water. Depends what you're making...
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Andy Dingley wrote:

I think I'd stay away from any water-based adhesive on particle board if it were me. You ain't just whistling Dixie when you say that it hates water.
I'm thinking I might use some kind of Liquid Nails product in a caulk tube. Some solvent based sticks on your clothes, wash after wash type thing.
I'd stay away from particle board though. I hate that stuff. OSB, maybe, sometimes, MDF probably, but particle board? Bleah.
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But it is supposed particleboard is more ressistant to the water than MDF. Is it? That is why I selected particleboard to the top.
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don't use mdf either
Faustino Dina wrote:

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I'm making the tops of kitchen's base cabinets, including one for the sink. The tiles are wide, 19.3 inches each side, so they rest on the walls of the cabinets so I hope the particleboard top will not get all the load. My first concern is the long term reaction of the particleboard to the glue's humidity. My hope is to seal enought the space between splits that the sink's water will not reach the particleboard underneath. So I was thinking that may be a water ressistant glue such as epoxies could' seal the particleboard surface as well as glue the tiles. Is it?
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don't bother. particle board, chipboard,mdf... all of those are going to be a 1 or 2 year product in that location. if you're looking to slap it together as cheap as possible for quick sale, well, you're on your own. if this is supposed to last, use the right stuff.
deck: exterior grade plywood. vapor barrier: black builder's paper of tyvek. setting surface: cementitious tile backer board. adhesive: thinset.
I really suggest that you do more research before you get started....     Bridger
On 8 Dec 2003 06:31:21 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@matusa.com.mx (Faustino Dina) wrote:

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use water resistant ply (3/4" or better) for strength and then backer board (Durock is one brand name - comes in at least 3 thicknesses: 1/4 3/8 1/2) on top of that. use thinset with a latex additive for additional moisture resistance. DON'T USE PB!
dave
Faustino Dina wrote:

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Is Durock the same as Sheetrock?
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NO! Not even close. Go to this link: http://www.usg.com/brands/drck.asp
It is a cementitious underlayment for laying tiles. Use it in a shower for the walls, on the ceiling, on the floor. Use 1/2 for walls, 3/8 for counter tops, 3/8 or 1/4 for floors if you need it low as possible to mate up with surrounding floor coverings.
dave
Faustino Dina wrote:

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Thanks you Dave, you really cleared my mind... I even localized two Durock providers on my area. I was asking about Sheetrock 'cause it is a remodelation going on at my office and I'm really amazed how easy and fast the guys are creating new walls with sheetrock and the smootheness of the final surface. Nice materials.
Thanks Faustino
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sure! Bruce mentioned additional details like using thinset (modified) under the Durock to secure it to the plywood. That is how I do it also. I use the screws designed for Durock, available at HD. Only use the square drive version; the others will cam out. Make the thinset thinner for this, then when you set the tiles; otherwise the durock will be wavy. The screws will pull it tight, but if the thinset is too thick, between the screws it will be bowed up.
dave
Faustino Dina wrote:

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Wonderboard is ANOTHER brand of cementitious underlayment. Both of these are waterproof. cement and fiberglass panels you score and snap kinda like sheetrock, but the product isn't like sheetrock.
dave
Faustino Dina wrote:

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| | Is Durock the same as Sheetrock?
Simple answer? No. Sheetrock and Durock are both trade names for various materials and so we have to be careful to know what you're really asking.
Sheetrock typically means a sandwich of a gypsum core surrounded by a heavy paper lining, used for walls and ceilings. The common term for this is "drywall". There is a type of drywall with a green outer lining that is approved for use as wall and ceiling facing material in high humidity environments such as kitchens and bathrooms. It is not water-PROOF, which is why it cannot be used for surfaces destined for splashing or standing water.
Durock is a trade name for a sandwich of synthetic fiber and a type of ceramic. The other common trade name for this type of material is Wonderboard. In many U.S. jurisdictions it is the only approved material to which ceramic tile can be bonded, and this may be in the national code now.
--Jay
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if you aren't familiar with these products I urge you to pick up a copy of "Setting Tile" by Michael Byrne. You might become an expert if you read it from cover to cover.
dave
Faustino Dina wrote:

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yep. this is a good beginner to intermediate tile setting book. clear and to the point.     Bridger

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On 8 Dec 2003 06:31:21 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@matusa.com.mx (Faustino Dina) wrote:

OK, as a minimum you need to look at good grades of water-resistant plywood. For a sink surround, you need to use a good grade where you either read the markings on the sheet yourself, or you trust the supplier, because a lot of "waterproof" plywood is anything but. And remember that it's _your_ phone number the customer has !
Then standard tile adhesive and a waterproof (bathroom grade) grout will work fine.
Another material that's worth looking at is Aquapanel (a UK brand). This is a "cement and fibreglass" board that handles like heavier drywall, but is especially suited to making shower enclosures. It's not especially strong (support it wth plywood underneath) but it really doesn't mind water long-term. I've used it for outdoor raised garden ponds - butyl rubber liner inside, tiled outside.
You _really_ don't want to use particle board or MDF on a job like this. Two years down the line and the client is going to hate you...
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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get "Setting Tile" by Michael Byrne.
The only way to make a counter tile job last is to use cement backer board.
Make a sandwich of 5/8" or 3/4" exterior grade CD plywood, then a layer of backer board (wonder or durock) of 1/4" - 1/2" depending on your final counter target thickness. Secure the cement board to the plywood with a layer of latex modified thinset (Versabond at the HD is good) followed by cad plated drywall screws (gold colored) spaced every 8". Lay your tiles on top of this surface with the same thinset (caulk the joint between the counter and backsplash with a good silicon sealer before each layer of backer board and tile)
The biggest gripe with tile counters is the grout turning nasty. The best bet is to use epoxy grout (latticrete) but it is difficult to work with. At the very least use a sealer monthly.
-Bruce
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Faustino Dina wrote...

mastic
Jim
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Stay away from anything water based. Bare minimum you should seal the particle board for better adhesion. If you want to do it the right way, you should glue and screw cement backer board to the part board (i.e. Durock) and then use thinset to adhere the tiles to the backer board. I hope this isn't for a kitchen counter?
Faustino Dina wrote:

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