Gluing Broken MDF

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A neighbor is modifying the transom of a door to fit an opening. In the process he broke the corner off the MDF bottom plate that the transom windows rest on. Photograph at <http://primordial-light.com/mdf-transom.html . Best glue to repair this break?
Many thanks!
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On 6/28/2016 8:15 PM, Davoud wrote:

Probably more than just glue, but a Titebond glue should be fine. I would reinforce with pocket hole screws and or biscuits.
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I'd probably reach for the Titebond II, just regular wood glue. With wood glue, a good fit and more clamping pressure usually results in a better joint. Just don't damage the wood by cranking things down too tight.
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On 6/28/16 8:15 PM, Davoud wrote:

MDF is sawdust and glue. Don't over-think it. Use wood glue. If it's exterior, use a waterproof glue.
Don't pay attentions to all the wives' tales about over-pressure and all that crap. Just f'n glue it, sand it, paint it, have a beer and enjoy life.
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On 6/28/2016 10:58 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

daughter broke the head board on her antique bed. She called an asked what to do. I told her to collect all of the pieces and we would see what could be done.
Like a puzzle I put all of the pieces back together and glued with common wood glue. (I do not remember if it was titebond or Elmer wood glue). Today she is sleeping in the bed every night, and it looks like nothing happened to it.
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Is it OK if I substitute tequila for the beer? ;) Otherwise, good advice.
I was working on some small wood boxes for the wife last night. I had to putty in some small holes. I have not bought any wood putty for a long time. I was reading the instructions to see if things have changed. I found two big changes in the instructions.
1) No clean up instructions. Apparently you just let the putty harden on your tools and break it off later with a hammer. I used paint thinner. That worked OK.
2) You are not supposed to apply the wood putty to your eyes?????? Something I never thought about. But this was more important than clean up instructions, apparently.
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On Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at 2:30:53 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote:

You can only fit so many letters on the label. The lawsuit for puttied eyes would cost them more than the lawsuit for puttied tools.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

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On Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 6:16:00 PM UTC-7, Davoud wrote:

As others have said, any old white glue. When it's dry, give the surface a pass with a hot iron (use aluminum foil or teflon sheet to keep paint off the iron). The glue doesn't make much of a seam bulge, but it goes down quicker with some heat than with sandpaper.
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whit3rd wrote:

Have never heard anything about using a hot iron to glue up a piece of wood. Going to call bullshit on that recommendation.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

White glue is thermoplastic. I often edge band by applying it to an edge, let it dry then iron on the edge band (hottest setting). Works well; however, the wood needs to be thin - up to 1/8" or so - for it to get hot enough.
An alternative way is to apply a heavy coat, let it dry then spritz lightly it with water (just enough so it turns white again). The water will make the surface tacky, easier to align banding - which needs to then be clamped - and less messy, no squeeze out. This is also a way to apply large sheets of cloth, paper or whatever to a substrate. No clamping is needed but the thin sheet of whatever needs to be squeeged on well and the dried glue on the substrate needs to be smooth (I use a surform plane to smooth it).
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On Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at 2:37:37 PM UTC-7, Mike Marlow wrote:

You didn't hear it, you read it in a newsgroup. The water in the glue swells the fibers near the joint, and the hot iron reflows the glue near the surface so you can press it flat after it's dry.
Works well on attaching veneers, too (iron-on after letting glue dry on one or both surfaces). Water-based glue swells the veneer if you apply it wet, and it splits when it dries.
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Titebond will work fine. Optional: add dowels for joint strength. Nix on biscuits or pocket screws as you will likely destroy more of the MDF. Art
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Artemus wrote:

Too little information about the damage to make any recommendation Dowels may not at all be necessary - maybe only only a simple glue joint.
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Mike Marlow:

The photograph was inadequate? Never mind. Titebond II did the job.
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Davoud wrote:

Nope - it was perfectly adequate. Too bad I didn't see the link until after I posted my reply. Happens some time...
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On 6/29/2016 5:00 PM, Artemus wrote:

So apparently you have not repaired MDF with biscuits or pocket hole screws. You might give it a try some time, you will probably be surprised.
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wrote:

best.
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On Wed, 29 Jun 2016 22:01:24 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Birch Plywood works best.
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wrote in message wrote:

I tend to replace things like this too... with ply or solid wood as seems appropriate.
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