Glues and Their Proper Storage

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Oleg Lego wrote:

North Texas these days so not too cold, but get down to 30s on occasion in the shop. Highs in the shop would be upper 90s.
Pete C.
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I dont do anything special with the hot melt gun sticks, they store fine.
I dont try to store anything else, just get some more for a particular task that the hot melt glue gun isnt suitable for.

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And with epoxies, be sure not to mix before needed. Sorry, I couldn't resist!
Bob Swinney

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"Robert Swinney" wrote: And with epoxies, be sure not to mix before needed. Sorry, I couldn't resist! ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ And I can't resist either. I ALWAYS mix my epoxy BEFORE I apply it.
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Yeah, but I meant a LONG time Before. You get the picture! Read my mind, not my test!
Bob Swinney

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Too_Many_Tools wrote:

I think this whenever I see the "refrigeration" storage method, as it applies to glue, coffee beans, whatever.
Most think this is all there is to it, but you have to consider that, whenever you take that item out of the refrigerator, it is a magnet for water in the air and will absorb it until its temperature reaches equilibrium with the surrounding environment. Water in your superglue, water in your beans, its all bad and it all accelerates the degradation process possibly even more than letting it sit on the shelf. Plus if you use as many beans as I do per cuppa joe, there just aint no sense in it unless you're buying the 50lb. econopak direct from colombia.
So if you are going to use this method remember that and don't take it out of its (airtight) bag until it has set for awhile at the working temperature.
er
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wrote:

Good point. Remember, cold air is much less moisture laden than warm air so the fridge may actually be drying the stuff out.
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The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote:

That's completely mangling the physics.
What matters is that the humidity level is 100%.
The drying out effect is actually due to ice condensing out of the air on the coldest surfaces and its that effect that drys things out.
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Rod Speed wrote:

It's going to be the dew point for the air localized around the cool object, I think. You can have a low relative humidity at the ambient temperature, meaning a large difference between the air temp. and the dew point, but because the air temp drops around the object you cross the dew point and condensation occurs.
But it's been sloshing around in the back of my head for a while now, so I may have that wrong.
er
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It should be at the dew point thruout the fridge.

Thats mangling the story too. The dew point is just the temp at which dew occurs and is basically 100% relative humidty then.

Yeah, it is rather mangled.
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Rod Speed wrote:

You seem to still be thinking inside the box. :) Remove the object from the icebox, and what the dew point in the icebox is irrelevant.
I'm talking about *ambient* relative humidity, which can be quite low, and you (having only mentioned humidity)... were still inside the icebox.
You won't get any condensation (unless relative hum. is 100%) until you cross the dew point. You'll do this even if the relative humidity isn't 100% in a localized area around a cool object if the object cools the surrounding area to the dew point.

I assume the rest of your post is still inside the box. ;)
er
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Nope, you are.

I wasnt even commenting on that situation, I was JUST commenting on his DRYING OUT claim.

Because I was JUST commenting on his DRYING OUT claim.

Irrelevant to his DRYING OUT claim which I was commenting on.

Nope, yours is.
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Rod Speed wrote:

Well I don't know anything about the inside of a refrigerator that would indicate it was governed by any other laws of physics than those present in the outside world. It all still applies.
And he might be right that the freezer is drying it out.
If the object is embedded or surrounded by ice its temperature will oscillilate with a much lower amplitude than that of the refrigerator air. And it'll probably, on average, be higher than the average temperature of the air in the freezer. Therefore its vapor pressure will be marginally higher and there *will* be a net flow of water vapor out.
It happens to meat that's ruined by "freezer burn", which is just partially freeze dried meat.
er
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No it doesnt. There is no equivalent outside the fridge of the area where frost forms inside the fridge. Its that that produces the drying out of food etc that isnt covered etc.

That wasnt what he said about the MECHANISM.

Irrelevant what was being discussed, THE DRYING OUT.

Wrong again.

Utterly mangled all over again with what causes DRYING OUT.

Nope, not the way you claim.

No its not. Its the dried out meat. Dying out even when frozen.
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The OTHER Kevin in San Diego wrote:

Rod is right. There's may be less moisture in the air at that temperature, as you say, but it'll still be absorbed.
Even more so, perhaps, if you place the glue next to the cooling fin it'll be often cooler than the surrounding refrigerated air, and you'll be in the same situation as when you just take it out into the ambient air. Good to keep it in airtight plastic.
er
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"I think this whenever I see the "refrigeration" storage method, as it applies to glue, coffee beans, whatever. Most think this is all there is to it, but you have to consider that, whenever you take that item out of the refrigerator, it is a magnet for
water in the air and will absorb it until its temperature reaches equilibrium with the surrounding environment. Water in your superglue,
water in your beans, its all bad and it all accelerates the degradation
process possibly even more than letting it sit on the shelf. Plus if you use as many beans as I do per cuppa joe, there just aint no sense in it unless you're buying the 50lb. econopak direct from colombia. So if you are going to use this method remember that and don't take it out of its (airtight) bag until it has set for awhile at the working temperature. er"
Good point about the potential of condensation that might cause a problem with the super glue.
I do know that I store the super glue in a closed container with dessicant. The glue is removed from the jar, used, and replaced in the jar again in a very short time so it is exposed to any moisture for a very short time.
The contact cement I have seems to solidify even when there is solvent still in the can...very curious since I thought contact cement was a solvent evaporation process.
TMT
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I bought a can (about 250ml) of Contact cement about 15 years ago. Every 12 months or so I prise open the lid and use some for a few jobs I've saved up, then after use carefully tap the lid all around the edge to make sure it seals well. The cement is as liquid as it was when purchased and there is no solidified cement in the can or on its sides. If only all adhesives were so reliable and could be packaged so effectively! -- John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@suburbian.com.au says...

Yeah-but, the "super" glue and airplane-model glue formulas are much more aggressive.
It is really annoying to go around with this tube permanently stuck in my nostril.
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Be thankful you weren't repairing hemorrhoids.
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Just go ahead and sniff those glues to use them up..... then they won't be left sitting around!
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