Glues and Their Proper Storage

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How do you store your various glues?
With three different glues, I seldom have success.
- Super glue With super glue, I use it once and when I come back later to use it again the tube has hardened. I keep the super glue container with its secured cap in a jar with dessicant in the refrigerator.
- Contact glue With contact glue, again I use it once and when I come back later to use it again the can has solidified. I keep the contact glue with its secured cap in a sealed ziplock bag in the refrigerator.
- Elmer's woodworking glue With Elmer's woodworking glue, I notice that if an container is opened the glue slowly thickens and finally turns into a sold mass within the the container even if stored at room temperature with the cap securely tightened.
Any hints as to how to keep glue stored so it doesn't go bad?
Thanks
TMT
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Too_Many_Tools wrote:

buy smaller quantities and use it faster.
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I've got botles of CA that sat in my shed for probably 10 years that are still usable. Building a trainer with my son with 'em.

Never had a can around long enough (used to do a LOT of laminate work) to let it sit...

The yellow stuff? Same as the CA.. Just seems to last and last as long as the cover is on the bottle.
My "longevity" issue is with tubes of caulk or silicone sealant.. They never seem to last more than a week after I open 'em, regardless of the measures I take to seal 'em up.
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The OTHER Kevin in San Diego wrote:

would you like a foolproof tip for keeping caulking good after opening? wrap painter's tape around the tip and extend the wrap about an inch or so above the nozzle (wrapping like a barber pole stripe). then squeeze the caulk so you see it swell up inside the tape and then release the pressure. the next time (a day or 6 months later) just remove the tape and pull off the hardened stuff which will come off with the tape. then you can squirt fresh caulk from the tube like it has just been opened for the first time. You can repeat this process over and over. I stumbled upon it after using the worthless "trick" of shoving a nail into the tip, which doesn't work with a crap.
it works with panel adhesive, silicone and other caulks.
Dave
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how is this different than the tubes that come with caps? i have the same problem with them? i've cut open the tubes when i can't get anything to come out, and the curing seems to work it's way down the tube from both ends once they're used.
also note that they have an expiration date. if past that, they sometimes don't harden at all. also, heat seems to degrade them when in storage, or at least when i keep them in my garage, which is probably 130 or more in the summer, it does.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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Charles Spitzer wrote:

forget the caps. use the tape.
dave
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Not to mention, the nail rusts and contaminates the caulk.
David wrote:

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Thanks, that's a keeper. Cheers, JG
David wrote:

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"My "longevity" issue is with tubes of caulk or silicone sealant.. They never seem to last more than a week after I open 'em, regardless of the measures I take to seal 'em up. "
In this case I don't have a problem with caulks...I just wrap a piece of tape around the open tip and put in on a shelf which is subject to normal indoor temperatures and humidity.
TMT
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I have the same frustration with silicones and the likes. I love the GOOP-type products, as well as high-temp silicone sealer. The stuff is expensive and it seems I only get to use it once or twice before the whole tube sets up. :-(
Good flying, desmobob
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On 27 Jan 2006 11:34:18 -0800, "Too_Many_Tools"

I stuff a 16d nail down the nozzle and wrap the end with duct tape. Still doesn't seem to work. Even the cap that comes with some of the tubes doesn't work. I'm caulk cursed I guess. :)
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I press masking tape over the open tip and then wrap the rest around the nozzle. I get up to 6 months or more with caulk and silicone. Sometimes you have to squirt out thickened caulk or silicone. The High temp silicone in Al tubes I put a piece of Al foil over the end and put the cap back on lasts for years that way. Don't have a fix for super glue yet. Karl

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The OTHER Kevin in San Diego wrote:

Lee Valley Tools sells some caps for tubes that look like tiny red condoms. They're cheap -- a few bucks for 20-25, IIRC. Squeeze a tiny ball of caulk or whatever out of the tip (supposedly to be sure the air is out of the tip) then put one of these jobbies on the tip and unroll it (they're about 1.5" long). When you need the caulk again, just roll up the cap and it's ready to go. Afterwards, the cap can be reused.
I've had open tubes of silicone caulk, latex caulk and Liquid Nails that have been fine when opened after being stored for a year in the basement.
Tove
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Tove Momerathsson wrote:

the blue tape trick is cheaper...
dave
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Are you storing your CA anywhere your bottle of accelerator?. Do you ever add CA to a joint after spraying accelerator near it? The accelerator vapors that get into open CA will severely shorten its life.
-- Mike Norton

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"Too_Many_Tools" wrote: (clip) How do you store your various glues? (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I have a small bottle of super glue that has been in my refrigerator for years, and it is still usable. I have other bottles of super glue that have been on the shelf in my shop/garage for months to years. The oldest ones (years) are now solid. The newest (months) are A-OK. How long do yours take to go bad?
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I purchased this stuff at the Pamona Swap Meet and I was told to put it in the FREEZER and it stays perfect it will fast activate with SIMPLE GREEN and when you add backing soda makes a super bond. Ed ke6bnl
MxBon 50g Bottle
MxBon 50g Bottle SKU:
MXBON 105 is a high strength, instant bonding adhesive which can be used for virtually any type of fastening job. It's a single component that bonds almost all close-fitting smooth surfaces in second at room temperature. It requires no mixing, no heating, and no clamping. It contains no solvent, has low toxicity, mild odor and is non flammable. HOW IT WORKS: MXBON 105 polymerizes when pressed into a thin film. The very thin layer of water moisture present on most surfaces in combination with the absence of oxygen (an anaerobic bond) acts as an alkali, which is the catalyst that acts in bonding. Excess traces of water will prevent the effective bonding of the materials. SURFACE PREPARATION: Clean any oils or water by using acetone or M.E.K (glass should be cleaned with alcohol to prevent any residue accumulation). Metals should be free of rust and debris. Roughing up the surface of metals (with sandpaper) will increase the bonding. Remove any traces of the old glue if the surface has been bonded before. DIRECTIONS FOR USE: Apply a small amount of MXBON 105_ to the surface to be bonded. (Usually one side). Lap them together to achieve a thin, uniform application. Then fix them securely at prescribed position. The thinner the adhesive application, the stronger the bond will be. CARE/STORAGE: Avoid direct sunlight. Store in a cool, dry place. (20-25C) (68-77F). For long term storage, refrigeration or freezer is recommended. Hints and Tricks Hint#1 Use any house hold baking soda as instant bondo type filler. Can be used even for small plumbing leaks, medal filler, substitution for a wood puddy etc. Can also be used with shavings of like material for matching color.ie jewlery making etc. Will in most cases take high heat and water etc. Hint#2 Instead of buying expensive glue remover use Acetone. (seperating glued fingers) etc. Acetone also makes a great cleaner/preparer for glass/medal. Hint#3 Use ordinary hand lotion as a precautionary to avoid adhesion of fingers/skin. Complete with ultra fine applicators to avoid excessive glue use and proper glue dispersal. Complete with Special No-clog lid (needle bulit into cap) to consistently keep lid free of glue build up. GLUES VIRTUALLY ANY MATERIAL SUCH AS: PLASTIC/RUBBER including polyurethane, neoprene, fiberglass, Kevlar, graphite, polycarbonate, PVC, abs, polystyrene, Teflon, etc. O-Ring, vacuum belt, and gasket repair or installation. Electronic manufacturing repair. Auto weather stripping, dashboard and molding repair. Pool equipment. Fishing equipment (lures, poles, etc). Toys, Models, RC, etc. Surf boards/ wake boards METAL including steel, aluminum, stainless steel, copper, brass, etc. Jewelry repair/manufacturing Thread locking Machining parts (auto, industrial) Knife making WOOD Antique restoration Wood refinishing Furniture making and repair Architectural models Musical instruments Picture frame manufacturing and repair Crafts ALSO, GLUES MINERALS/ GEMS/ COMPOSITES/ LEATHER and millions of other uses. PRICE:     $15.00
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Elmer's has a shelf life and you can't stop the slow but steady degradation. Near the end when it is too thick, a little water will thin it back out, but it has lost strength at that point. The only remedy is to buy small containers to avoid a big, half-empty, bottle on the shelf.
Buy contact cement in the aerosol can and it will last a very long time. Several years at least. 3M makes some very good ones.
Now you know why super glue comes in such small containers.
Randy
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Too_Many_Tools wrote:

I don't use this often, but a bottle of the gel version seems to be just fine after a year or so at varying temperature in the unheated shop.

I use this a bit more than super glue, generally using the good flammable version for laminate. I don't recall ever having it go bad on me. The nonflammable and newer latex version may have different shelf lives.

I don't use the Elmer's wood glue, all I have used in recent years is the Titebond II which I have excellent results with. I typically have one of the big jugs of the stuff and use it to refill a couple of the smaller squeeze bottles with the push pull tops. These have sat in the shop over hot summers and cold winters and I've use it under all temperatures without any problems.

I don't know as you seem to have particularly bad luck. Perhaps read the container for recommended storage conditions.
Pete C.

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The Pete C. entity posted thusly:

I have always kept my Titebond in the house, as I wondered about the cold. What do you call 'cold winters'?
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