glues

what is the best glue for wood scale models?
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Fish glue. (scales...)
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On Thu, 14 Dec 2006 23:21:30 +0000, Toller wrote:

not the answer i was looking for but a good one.
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g wrote:

Fish glue isn't bad actually. High initial tack, and it can be stabilised so it stores cold in a bottle.
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wrote:

which labels are fish glue?
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The labels with the words "fish glue", of course! <G>
Here's Lee Valley's offering: <http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p 019&cat=1,110,42965>
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It depends. White glue works ok for some projects, it's terrible for others. Yellow glues are probably a good thing to start with.
Puckdropper
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Glue depends on what you want to stick together. For RC airplanes, I use CA in thin, medium, and thick, and also white or carpenters glue. Elmers or Titebond. The CA is fast, but I like the water based glues where speed of setup is not important. For metal to wood, plastic, or other stuff, either the CA or epoxy.
Having built some scale ship models, whatever sticks and doesn't show! I used a white glue to plank a hull, along with pins for clamping. Same glue for masts, rigging, and most all wood-wood pieces. Also for seizings and all rigging. Then a touch of black paint to simulate tar. For a model that started off as an in the water scale, I used epoxy for strength. It later became display only due to problems with water and wood checking.
To sum up, most glues will work if they give you a strong bond. The neatness is up to you. If it doesn't show, your model will look OK. If it does - gonna be you-glee, no mater what the scale.
Hope this helps a little.
Rich.....
Puckdropper wrote:

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Puckdropper wrote:

I always liked the various CA glues for models.
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check out Ambroid model building glue, available at most hobby shops.
Jack Flatley Jacksonville, Florida
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g wrote:

For new work (clean unpainted wood) where you can clamp the joint while the glue dries, Elmer's white glue or carpenter's yellow glue gives a good bond, often the bond is stronger than the wood. For a real woodworking joint like mortise and tenon it is unbeatable. For plain butt joints on end grain it won't be as strong and clamping can be a problem. For the hard-to-clamp / unclampable joints, the cellulose cements (Ambroid or Duco) dry fast enough to not need clamping. A joint will be hard within a minute or two and you can hold it together with fingers until the cement sets. The joints won't be as strong as the carpenter's glue, but they are good enough for a lot of model work. CA (Superglue) is also fast setting, especially if you breath on it, and quite strong. It also bonds well to metal details, which cement and the carpenter's glues won't. CA comes in "gap filling" and "thin and runny" flavors. The gap filling is thicker and fills in gaps in joints that didn't fit all that well. The "thin and runny" is like water and will suck up into mounting holes by capillary action. Then there is epoxy. The epoxy joints are very strong, and the joints don't need clamping the way carpenter's glue does. You do need to somehow hold the parts in place while the stuff hardens (often several hours) but you don't have to clamp the joint tightly enough to get glue squeezeout the way you do with carpenter's glue. Finally there are the contact glues (Ambroid's Goo, the various contact cements for putting down laminate counter tops). These will stick wood to wood or wood to slippery plastic and don't need clamping. Down side is you don't get to slide the joint around to make it fit. Once the two surfaces touch, they stick and don't move. You just get one shot to position everything just right. If you miss, too bad. For wooden model railroad cars I use carpenter's glue to fasten the end blocks to the roof and floor, 'cause I want the greater strength, and cement to attach the tiny stripwood details 'cause I cannot clamp them, and CA or epoxy to attach metal fittings.
David Starr
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On Fri, 15 Dec 2006 12:03:45 -0500, David Starr wrote:

David, a comment here--if you haven't tried using Titebond II or III for the metal fittings you might want to give it a shot--when I get that stuff on an unwaxed clamp, it doesn't come off--never expected it to stick to metal, learned my lesson now.

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J. Clarke wrote:

price of 12 oz". I'm getting down to the bottom of it and next time I'm buying Titebond mostly 'cause of all the favorable things said about Titebond on this news group.
David Starr
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On Thu, 14 Dec 2006 21:41:57 +0000, g wrote:

I went and purchased elmer's ultimate and a bottle of interior exterior glue. Using the ultimate, mainly because of the logo of a blue bull. The project is basically a nativity scene for Christmas. Its made out of a warped sheet of 1/4" board, stained with minwax (golden oak, red mahogany, and provincial). After staining used some tung oil. Big mistakes staining before gluing, crooked cuts, probably not enough drying time for the various liquids. I'm still working on it so hopefully it does not come out totally messed up.
anyone know how to hook up a mini mp3 player so it plays silent night or something?
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*snip*

Hook the output of the MP3 player to a set of speakers. Change batteries when needed, if using them.
Puckdropper
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