Glueing Wood to Formica

I need to fasten a small moulding (1/4 inch thick) between the counter top and the back splash. One way is small brads. However, I keep thinking that there is some glue that will do the job. I tried contact cement and it will not stick to the formica. What about something like gorilla glue? Any other suggestions?
Len
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
construction adhesive?
silicon?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's interesting. Formica is attached to wood with contact cement.
Super glue might work.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lowell Holmes responds:

Laminates are coated on their backs to attach to substrates. Coating their fronts with contact cement isn't useful.
The OP might try using epoxy. I don't think polyurethane glue will do much better than contact cement, but either one will get an improved hold if he marks the area of the molding and uses a small and very fine file to rough up the laminate's surface.
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i'd probably roughen up the surface and use ge silicone 2. i use it to hang glass sheets on metal standoffs or french cleats, and then hang them on the wall. haven't had any fall off, and they weigh 8-10 lbs apiece. let dry for at least 24 hours without touching it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leonard Lopez wrote:

The "This to That" (glue advice) recommends "Household Goop" as providing the strongest bond between wood and plastic. See:
http://www.thistothat.com/cgi-bin/glue.cgi?lang=en&this=Wood&that=Plastic
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and boy is it strong.
--
When Replying Remove "thepin" From Return Address

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Roo Glue or any melamine glue. The top layer of formica is a melamine skin.
Is the quarter round really necessary? In general I find a molding here to be a bad idea. Best to make a tight joint and color caulk.
mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leonard Lopez writes:

<snip>
Personally, I would not use a molding, especially wood, in this application.
I'd use, 3M, 5200 marine caulk, that these days, even Home Depot sells for about $10 a tube.
I've even used it to caulk the joint between ceramic wall tile and a cast iron bath tub with a glazed surface.
Two caveats:
1) Takes some time to fully cure out, sometimes up to a week.
2) Don't ever expect to take the joint apart unless you have at least a 1500W heat gun and the patience of JOB.
SFWIW, use 3M, "blue tape" to mask the joint before applying 5200.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.