glued on mirror help

I was wondering if anyone has run into having to take off a large bathroom glued on mirror.
I'm getting ready to put some bead board in my bathroom but can't figure out how to remove the mirror from the wall without breaking the mirror or cutting out the drywall with it.
The builder just went thru and either caulked (I hope) or glued them to the wall.
If anyone's successfully done this I'd love to hear from ya.
thanks.
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I have taken a hand saw and very carefully slipped it behind a mirror to cut through the mastic. Once you get most of it loose it should not be a problem to remove the mirror.

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calmly ranted:

I've seen them removed with piano wire or guitar string. Wrap the ends around dowels and pull it between the mirror and wall like a cheese cutter.
You probably won't be able to save the mirror, but it is a faint possibility. If he used construction adhesive instead of caulk, you probably won't be able to do that and may end up breaking out the mirror and replacing drywall.
G'luck!
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Depending on how it was put on...
I have used fishing line toied to two sticks, with sufficient length to go across width, slip it behind and kinda saw it as you pull down...
Mike

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wrote:

with construction adhesive, not caulking.
My first choice would be to try to remove the drywall and the mirror as a unit, so you can get it to the shop where it's easier to work on. The drawback to this is that there's probably nails or screws in the drywall behind the mirror, making this method impossible.
My next choice would be messy but should work; Get a squirt bottle, of the type that glue comes in, at least a pint in size. Fill it with lacquer thinner, and use the squirt spout to dribble the thinner in behind the mirror and gently, gently, oh so gently, apply a little pressure at the top edge to start pulling the mirror free. Keep dribbling the thinner and eventually it should turn loose.
This will likely result in you having to remove, or, at the least, repaint a large section of the drywall, but should get the mirror down in one piece. It would be nice to have some help on hand too because this is at least a 3-armed job. Don't forget adequate ventilation and something to protect the floor/baseboard.
In retrospect, unless this is expensive, beveled edge glass, I think I'd most likely just suit up with proper protection and make a few strategic taps with a hammer. 1/8" mirror glass isnt all that expensive and replacing it would be a lot less hassle than trying to remove what you have in one piece.
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James Dean wrote:

precautions.
--

Gerald Ross, Cochran, GA
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Thanks much guys for your help.
Didn't think about the nails still in the drywall if I cut the mirror out, that saved some frustration.
Tried the wire approach and it looks like it's been attached with industrial strength double sided tape.
It immediately gums up the wire and puts all that to a stop right away.
I think Gerald made the most sense about the cost of the mirror and replacing it versus the headache of trying to take it off in one piece.
I'm off to break some glass ;0)
Thanks guys.

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