Glue with long open time


I did a Google search and found nothing relevant.
I am in the planning stage for a project that will require gluing up large plywood pieces into dadod and doweled joints. Because of the size of the units involved, I need to find a glue with a long open time, perhaps, 30 to 45 minutes for each assembly.
Any suggestions as to the type of glue I should be looking at? I usually use Titebond (II), which I push to 10 minutes on occasion, but don't think I can keep it open long enough for this project.
____________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
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How about using a 2-part epoxy like System 3? I'm using it on the new windows I'm making and it works well. Over 1 hr of working time before setting and 24 hr cure time.
Joe T
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says...

You could use Aerolite 300 or 308 in 'separate' application. Mix the powder with water to achieve resin, put on single joint surface[s] (indefinite open time). Brush hardener/catalyst on other surface (this is formic acid i.i.r.c.) and assemble. You'll have an assembly time of around 15-20 minutes after contact if ambient temp. isn't too hot. Might be longer, I haven't read the data sheet in 15 years or so. Last time I used it like this is when I had to glue up a dining table top from 3/4" stips because the timber I had bought twisted so much I had to break it down ... then glued up 12 strips at a time into slabs which I re-jointed and made into the table top. I think it will've taken me 1/2 hour per slab or thereabouts to assemble and clamp. The problem is not to have the hardener dry out too much so it can still trigger the resin off.
-P.
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I'm planning on using polyurethane glue on a more complicated part of my current project, as it claims 30 min of open time, I think. Good luck, Andy
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Peter recalled the following:
>Brush hardener/catalyst on other surface (this is formic acid i.i.r.c.)
Isn't formic acid what the Fire Ants inject into your skin that causes the burning/itching? Wouldn't want to get that on anything.
I just bought TiteBond Extended Open Time glue. The description on the bottle says its similar to TiteBond II, only it's white instead of yellow.
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Sure wouldn't want to get it into your eyes. But basically not that different from Vinegar. I spilled 90% vinegar over my leg once, the skin was starting to blister by the time I had ripped the jeans off and got the leg under the cold tap. I very much doubt the 'GBP hardener' would be concentrated acid in any event. I had it on my skin briefly without adverse effects.
-P.
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I use Titebond (II) expended. It says 15 minutes, but I expect it is rather longer than that. I haven't tried this, but I bet if you added a small amount of water, it will also add some time without degrading it significantly.
If you watch 15 minutes go by on a clock, it is an awfully long time to be doing an assemble. I once was afraid I couldn't do it because the assembly was so complicated, and it wound up taking all of 5 minutes.
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I've never used it but I've heard David Marks comment numerous times that Plastic Resin glue allows for a long open time. He seems to use it fairly often. I've not seen this stuff on the shelves of HD or Lowes but I believe you can purchase it online fairly easily. I also believe (possibly incorrectly) that Hide Glue will give you a long open time as well. Cheers, cc
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some glues with long open times: recorcinol urea formaldehide epoxy polyurethane hide latex caulking
they have pretty different properties. you'll have to determine which one is right for your application.
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Garrett Wade (dot com) has a wood glue with 30 minute open time, it's got "extra strength", too. I couldn't find it anywhere else, it is '202GF' as opposed to '2002GF' which is found at Lee Valley. Never tried it tho...
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
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Their regular glue is excellent. I expect the extended is also, though I haven't tried it.
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On Mon, 20 Mar 2006 08:07:13 -0500, Bill Waller wrote:

Unibond 800. Its a two-part urea-formaldehyde glue. All time parameters (pot time, open time, and clamp time) are somewhat a function of the mix ratio, and of temperature. I've had very good luck using it for complex glue-ups. It cleans up with warm soapy water until it cures. Full cure takes 12 hours or more, again somewhat a function of mix ratio and temperature.
The powdered catalyst is available in three color grades, light, medium, and dark. Light seems a good match for hard maple, medium for red maple and red oak, dark for cherry. I have not tried matching any other wood species. I suspect you can mix different color catalyst to get an "in-between" color, but I have not tried that.
Be aware of a few things. This stuff is not good for your lungs. Mix and apply in an area with good ventilation, and wear a respirator mask with organics filters. You may notice some eye irritation with long exposure. If that happens, take a break away from the work area for a few minutes. Wear gloves (nitrile seems OK).
I obtained mine on the web, from VacuPress. Check the web page:
http://www.vacupress.com/veneerglue.htm
[I have no connection whatsoever with VacuPress, other than as a satisfied customer.]
--
Art


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DAP Weldwood Plastic Resin urea-formaldehyde glue. This is the best stuff for long complicated glue ups. One more note, the squeeze out can be very hard and sharp, sand (with mask) before running it through your machines or using a hand plane.
Dave
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On Mon, 20 Mar 2006 13:21:14 -0800, Teamcasa wrote:

Yes, that is the same as (or very similar to) the Unibond product.
I've also seen a "precatylized" plastic resin glue. This is a powder that you mix with water. I don't know much about it. It seems that having the catalyst pre-mixed is a convenience, but the probable trade-off being that you don't get to adjust the cure times by adjusting the mix ratio. Its available on the JoeWoodworker.com / VeneerSupplies.com website.
--
Art


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My local Ace Hardware carries DAP plastic resin glue.
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Bill Waller wrote:
<snip> > Because of the size of the units > involved, I need to find a glue with a long open time, perhaps, 30 to 45 > minutes for each assembly. > > Any suggestions as to the type of glue I should be looking at?
For anything other than white oak, epoxy.
For white oak, resorcinol.
Lew
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