Glue with long open time?


Have a fairly complicated (for me) assembly coming up. All I ever worked with is Titebond. Need more time. Do all polyurethane glues foam up? Is that any problem? Like open up a joint? Any help is greatly appreciated.
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Rick Samuel wrote:

I've used Gorilla Glue with such situations. Working time is at least 30 minutes. If you use JUST A LITTLE, and spritz the surfaces with water, I have had little trouble with ooze issue.
I also clamp or tack/nail joints, or they will open up, for me at least.

Try a scrap piece first to get the hang of it. I have had the best results when I can do glue/nail joints.
Again, be VERY sparing with the glue. I put on a fine bead, or even a few drops, then use a knife blade, etc., to spread it out, and NOT to the edge of the work. I am not depending on the glue to do any sort of filling. If I have that situation, then I go to an epoxy.
You didn't say what kind of wood you have, but my experience with Gorilla glue is that it works nicely with such things a walnut and cherry, as of course, pine, spruce, etc.
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I'm using plywood, sanded fir, 7 ply, no voids. Pretty fair quality, considering it's from HD

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Rick Samuel wrote:

Have you considered Titebond Extend? Gives you about 3 times the working time of regular Titebond.
--
--John
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Check the open time for hide glue
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henry wrote:

"real" hide glue heated to 140 degrees has less than a minute on heated wood and 30 seconds on cold wood. The stuff in the bottle is really not worth using IMO It has a very critical shelf life from what I have heard.
sw
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slideways wrote:

I've used the liquid stuff for several projects over the years. I've never had any trouble, but I checked the date on the container before buying. If it's less than a year old it works fine. And yes, it has a long open time.
The "real" stuff does "tack up" pretty quick, but it'll still grip for a few minutes or more. I haven't done it yet, but urea (try a garden center) will keep it usable longer. I don't remember the porportions. Do a Google.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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On Sun, 18 Jun 2006 19:11:57 -0400, "J. Clarke"

I'm curious. How much time do I have with regular Titebond? I was gluing something up recently and I wanted to avoid squeeze-out as much as possible. I ran a line of glue around the 9' or so of the project, stopping at intervals to spread it across the width of the 3/4" plywood with a brush. Then I applied 14 clamps. I'm pretty sure that I was still within the window, but I realized that I didn't really know what the window was.
Greg Guarino
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Greg Guarino wrote:

Officially they say 5 minutes open time for regular, 10 for Titebond III, 15 for Extend. My gut tells me that those are conservative, but I've never timed gluing.
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Rick Samuel wrote:
> Have a fairly complicated (for me) assembly coming up. All I ever worked > with is Titebond. Need more time.
Cut to the chase, use the good stuff.
Epoxy
West Systems has slow hardner that will give you at least an hour of pot time.
Screw the Gorilla glue. IMHO, it's garbage.
Lew
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Yes, epoxy is the way to go.
And, in my opinion, polyurethane glues have absolutely no use in making fine furniture or cabinets. It is a real pain-in-the-ass to clean up the ooze out, and if you have any gap at all in the joint the expanded polyurethane has zero strength. Polyurethane glue is a solution looking for a problem, because there are much better alternative adhesives.
Mort
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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On Mon, 19 Jun 2006 00:50:37 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Absolutely agree. I've been using West Systems epoxy for years, and it will be perfect for what the OP wants.
Note to Rick: you won't find West at HD. Look for a boating/marine supply store. Those places usually have it in stock.
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Bill wrote:

-- It's turtles, all the way down
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And Rockler.
Bill wrote:

As does Woodcraft.
--
It's turtles, all the way down



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This is a glue sold by GW, "slo-set" white glue for wood, currently on closeout. I bought some for an upcoming project, but I have not tried it yet. Decent price.
http://www.garrettwade.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID 2764&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCat=0&iSubCat=0&iProductID2764
This is the only place in the US that I could find it for sale it online, and I believe it is also sold in Australia (searchable), if that's where you are. Here in the U.S. it took five days to get to me from the east coast to the west coast. I think it was UPS.
--
}<)))*> Alex - who is learing woodwork
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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wrote:

This might help. When I have a lot of joints to glue up sometimes I can leave one side dry, glue only one side, and clamp the assembly. The next day I glue up the other side.
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Rick Samuel wrote:

Titebond III is about 10 minutes. The Titebond liquid "hide" glue is similar. Either are much slower than standard white PVA glue which can be almost "instant" for tight joints in porous woods. Titebond I & II are about 5 minutes. If you are looking for something much slower for laminating or something similar try:
http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00030201.pdf
This is a urea formaldihyde "Plastic Resin Glue" that gives you plenty of time. It doesn't foam. It is a powder and you mix what you need with water. It has a four hour pot life and would normally be clamped for 24 hours or more. A Yahoo search for DAP Plastic Resin Glue will bring up several suppliers.
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