Glue weaker than wood?

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"Breakaways" are generally made without glue and with rather loose joinery all 'round.
Take a gander at WWE's chairs: They're a design that holds together when weight is applied (they can be sat upon) but fall apart fairly easily.
Casework is often made of styrene foam.
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It's pretty much a non issue. All modern wood glues are stronger then the wood, as is some not so modern ones so, from that point you would have to hunt around for some glue that is weaker then the wood but strong enough to withstand the forces it will encounter and I don't think fish or vegetable glue will cut it.
To look at it in another way, unless you are talking balsa wood models, wood it's self is pretty sturdy stuff and with properly made joints, if someone is going too, in the course of normal use, bang it around badly enough to break it either at the joint or the grain maybe it probably shouldn't have been made of wood to start with or they shouldn't have been allowed near it.
Lastly, we aren't talking, say a crankshaft breaking under transmitted stress we're talking wood that can be glued back up again.
I've had to repair glue joint failures and wood grain failures. I prefer the wood grain failures, the wood goes back together easily and seamlessly where as a failed glue line is usually a raggedy ass affair that always seem to end up as an obvious repair.
In short, it's horse pucky.
.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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On Mon, 28 Jun 2004 13:25:45 -0400, Michael Press
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No. It's crap. Glues are stronger than wood. Most joints involve the wood of one part intruding into the other part, specifically so that the wood has to break to break the joint.
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