Glue syringe to repair a split?

I assembled a face frame with pocket screws and decided to take the easy way out and pocket-screw the frame onto the plywood cabinet. This was successful, except that the oak 1x2 split at one end. I took the offending screw out and the wood went back together well enough that it's hard to see, but I'd like to repair it so it won't break off later.
I was wondering if I could clamp the area, drill a hole up into the split and inject some sort of glue. I see someone has tried this, but without drilling:
http://lumberjocks.com/woodshaver/blog/31497
Any ideas? If this is possible, advice on the type of glue and syringe would be helpful.
By the way, in fits and starts, I've made some progress on the CD Shelves project:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/11575872043/in/photostream/
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On 12/27/2013 5:45 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I have had good luck with simply prying the split open a small bit and pouring glue straight into the crack. Obviously you will need for the crack to be facing up so that gravity will let it go where it will.
You can also use masking tape to keep glue off of any areas that you don't want it to penetrate, like the end grain. Then clamp and wipe off the squeeze out. I have never had a piece break off using this method.
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On 12/27/2013 8:53 AM, Leon wrote:

That's a minor inconvenience, as the crack is at the very bottom of a unit that is 77" tall. I guess I'll need glue and a stepladder.

The end grain is where the split is, but in use it will be unseen (sitting on the floor). Can I assume the only problem with getting it on the end grain is cosmetic?
Then clamp and wipe off

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On 12/27/2013 8:44 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Ohhhhh. '~)

Yes, Strictly cosmetic.

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On 12/27/2013 9:44 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Try thinning the glue a little and using a vacum to pull it into the crack.. I would just get a few glue syringes from rockler, woodcraft or Lee valley and inject it into the hole then screw it together while using clamps to keep the crack closed.

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Jeff

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The method I use, often, for such cases, is to tape the surface, if possibl e, then wet any exposed surface, to keep the glue from adhering onto the su rface. Squeeze/press the glue into the crack, as best as possible, and, if I think I need more glue deeper into the crack, I use the air hose to blow the glue down into the crack. This method works best for me in most cases .
I never thought to use suction, on the backside, but that should work, if y ou can access the backside. For me, the air hose seems quicker and more co nvenient.
Comments about syringes and needles: Syringes and needles aren't (generally) perscription items. They are over- the-counter.
Your local pharmacy has TB syringes with 5/8", 21 gauge needles, sometimes lower guage needles (larger needles) are available, separately, as well. Y ou likely have to buy in bulk, 100 per box. Any size needle fits onto all syringe tips, so syringe size doesn't matter. If the hole in the tip of th e TB needle is too small, for easy flow of the glue, snip off the sharp tip of the needle, then pry open the shaft hole.... the shaft end having been smashed flat by the snipping.
A local farmer's co-op may have larger needles, & supplies, for service to livestock owners. Many farmers do their own routine injections and such.
You don't have to suck the glue from the needle end, to get it into the cyl inder. Remove the piston from the upper end and pour/squirt the glue into the cylinder.... a cleaner procedure, than sucking from the needle end.
Maybe your physician might sell you a syringe and large needle, also.
Your local surgical supply house will likely not sell you, directly, those sorts of items, unless you know someone who works there. If available, pur chase a damaged box at a discount.... now outlawed, here, that's what roost er-fighting folks did, buy damaged boxes for their injections.
Sonny
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"Greg Guarino" wrote:

<snip> ------------------------------------------------------------- Mix up some epoxy, tape off the surfaces where you don't want the epoxy, drive screw into wood to force open the crack, then pour in epoxy and back out screw to allow crack to close.
No clamps are req'd.
If unthickened epoxy can't be poured into crack without draining out before it can be filled, then thicken with micro-balloons and fill using a tongue depresser, putty knife, whatever.
BTDT many times.
Lew
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No syringe needed.
1. Put the screw back so the split opens (or open it otherwise)
2. Put yellow glue in the split
3. Remove screw (or whatever manner you opened the split) so it goes back together
4. Clamp it moderately
5. Wipe off any glue squeeze out
If you are going to use a screw in the hole again, make sure the hole is at least as big as the screw shank.
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My experience is almost exactly the same as yours, Mike.
djb
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Using the 1/32" to apply glue inside small cracks is another use for the versatile polypropylene shim.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pf917&cat=1,43456
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