Glue strength -- actual numbers?

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On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 00:06:16 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"
<snip>

That was my point, George... that it was a very positive piece...
Must be all those years in sales fermenting my brian, but I just appreciate how he stated it in such a positive manner...
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Enough to know that the glue adheres to itself with greater strength than the wood has along the grain. Unless, of course you don't spread or clamp properly. The rest is hype for woodworkers, because the material is too variable for precise data to be meaningful.

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George wrote:

Thanks to all that replied.
Yes, I guess this is the bottom line -- and I did know it; it was partly curiosity to know the numbers. I remember our teacher (in an introductory woodworking course I took) mentioned the actual number, and he did a demonstration; he glued together a couple of pieces by their edges, and then fixed it, took a hammer, and invited us to try and break it -- naturally, the piece kept breaking anywhere except at the glued surface!
Thanks,
Carlos --
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On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 23:45:51 -0500, Carlos Moreno

Why do you need to know? Have you had glue failure? What are your spec requirements that the manufacturer should meet? Most modern brand-name glues do far more than necessary to hold two pieces of wood together, so the actual rating is unimportant unless you are using it to build a 747, in which case you'd better make sure as well that the cuts are flat-accurate to =/-.001" or better. For any glues I know the wood would shatter well before the bond broke. Any break I've seen has had wood stuck to it, showing that the break was in the wood, and not between glue and wood [actual surface-surface bonding]. I'd be more concerned with other problems such as how long does it take to set. I had one that grew a mould [mold, US] and had to dump most of it.
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On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 23:45:51 -0500, Carlos Moreno

What more do you need to know (about strength) than the fact that the glue is stronger than the wood it bonds?
Don't heat the joint to 150F+ (or soak it in vinegar) and the bond will last your lifetime or longer.
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Wed, Nov 3, 2004, 11:45pm moreno_at_mochima_dot snipped-for-privacy@xx.xxx (CarlosMoreno) mumbled: Hi, I'm wondering if someone knows the actual numbers on glue strength? (i.e., strength per unit of surface) <snip>
In any practical applications, it doesn't matter, they're all stronger than the wood.
JOAT When you choose an action, you choose the consequences. - Unknown
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I couldn't find the strength data ... but I sure do like Gorilla glue. It's strong but has other desireable properties. It's waterproof, it's sandable, and glues a lot more than wood, etc.
http://www.gorillaglue.com/gGlue.html
[snip]
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Did manage to get a starved joint in my younger years. Wanted a "really strong joint" so I clamped it as tight as possible. Lots of squeeze out. It fell apart. The joint was dry. -Rick
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RE: Subject
1) Epoxy with micro-balloons 2) Resorcinol
After that, it's all down hill.
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