Glue stain advice needed

I noticed that I must have gotten some glue on a piece of wood I'm finishing since it doesn't take stain in the form of a drip run...
Is there any way to fix this besides sanding it all again?
Is there a way to prevent this? If I do notice some glue on a good surface, how should I take care of it? I've been using a wet rag... does that get it all?
I use regular white or yellow wood glue.
Thanks
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I doubt it.

Using a wet rag will smear the glue into the wood. Let it dry for a bit, then lift it with a sharp chisel, and scrape or sand after it's up.
djb
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After years of doing this, I pay careful attention to glue squeeze out if it is going to be in an area that I don't want to see it as in your case. I always keep an almost dripping wet paper towel handy while I do my glue ups. If the glue becomes a problem I wipe it up with that wet towel and rewipe 3 or 4 times more being careful to turn the rag after each wipe to prevent reapplying glue that was wiped up with the rag. Flooding the area helps to keep the glue from seeping down into the grain on woods like oak.
Prevention steps can be putting down masking tape to cover the vulnerable area. The problem with this is that if glue seeps under the tape it becomes really tough to remove after the glue cures. Some prescribe to letting the glue set a bit and removing with a stiff scraper or credit card. I don't in particular care for this method as traces of the glue are usually left behind.
After the fact, if I find a glue drip I use a scraper or chisel to "Scrape" the glue away from the spot and retouch with stain. I prefer not to sand the area and restain as the spot your are repairing becomes larger and more noticeable. Scrape only the area that the glue is covering and you will have a smaller repair to make.
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keeping it sopping wet also gives the water a chance to enter the joint and swell it or dilute the glue.
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finishing since it doesn't take stain in the form of

surface, how should I take care of it? I've been

I have tried finishing the parts before assembly. A little glue on afterwards isn't a big deal. Naturally, this is only useful in some circumstances.
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Get the Fine Woodworking Dec 03 issue. There's an article on "Touching up defects and mistakes".

finishing since it doesn't take stain in the form of

surface, how should I take care of it? I've been

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Bob Flint wrote:

TiteBond II yields a nice dark salmon color when shellac is applied over even a hint of it. I hate that.
A solution Michael Fortune uses is a product called Waxalit, a wax used on production woodworking machine working surfaces to reduce friction. Small amount applied with a finger tip or Q-tip where you don't want glue squeeze out keeps the glue from sticking to the wood. A little alcohol on a paper towel or Q-tip takes it off and doesn't affect later finish. He found this stuff was the solution to hours and hours of glue removal on Windsor chairs.
charlie b
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