glue squeeze out


How do you deal with glue squeeze out. If i wipe with a damp sponge I find that area does not take stain as dark as the rest of the wood. I am making raised panel doors and if I let the glue dry around the cope joints it is impossible to remove. Should I stain before glue up?
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I pre stain the raised panels and inner edges of the rails and stiles near the panel. Use an almost dripping wet paper towel to wipe the squeeze out and wipe several times while turning the towel each time to avoid rewiping the glue back on the piece. I have good results, even with red oak.
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I use blue tape - works good for me.

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Yes. Pre-finish the panels. I agree with M.Paul as far as the tape goes. Its a pain but in areas that are hard to reach to scrape or pare the glue away, it works great. I try to avoid using a wet rag/towel but sometimes its unavoidable. Most of the time, I just wait until the glue sets up then pare it away with a sharp chisel or just use a scraper.
Dave
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mark wrote:

I let the glue set up to a "snot" consistency (typically about 45 minutes for Titebond) and simply trim it off with a sharp chisel.
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Mark, I have found a number of ways to deal with squeeze out. Frequently I put on blue masking tape along the joint if possible. I also use Lee Valley's glue which has a much higher content of solids and less water. It drips much much less. A recently technique is using a plastic fine tooth adhesive spreading tool like for tiling or other and dragging it over any area more than about 1/2 inch wide and this creates grooves of less glue alternating with more glue and there is much much less squeeze out. The driippiness that so many woodworkers seem proud of with titebond had made me use it less (but it is cheap and works well)until if found the adhesive groover tool (really cheap relief - use it over and over) . You only need enough squeeze out to see the joint gap is filled. I also use less glue if my boards align better. I am getting better and better joints _ at least edge joints with less and less glue. Hope that helps. Oh, the lee valley glue is so dense it does not really sink in to the wood and is cleaned up when it becomes rubbery or later and seems to tear out wood very little. Also, has a nice color when dried. It is cheap except for the shipping. I also prefinish a lot.
Mike the progressively less incompetent woodworker
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"mark" wrote...

Lot of good tips here already, IMO. Best bet is to pick the technique that fits best for you, and stick with it till it becomes second nature.
Usually, I use titebond & pare off the minimal squeeze out after it has dried. I'm used to doing it this way and find it easy enough.
Last set of 4 doors I did I had this "great idea". I glued up 8 "L"s consisting of one stile and one rail each with hot hide glue, being careful they were square. Then went back to the first "L", popped a panel in, glued on the second "L", and voila, a square door! Rather, a rectangular door with square corners. >8^) The hot hide glue squeezage was easier to pare off than the titebond, and squaring the doors was easier, too. Much faster than trying to glue, keep clean, and square all four corners at once.
-- Timothy Juvenal www.rude-tone.com/work.htm
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sure all xcess glue is removed .After it is perfectly dry I final sand and stain the doors .Never had a problem with this procedure .Glue , I use tightbond
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To minimize squeeze out I "paint" the glue on both side of the joint. I get very little squeeze out.
> > How do you deal with glue squeeze out. If i wipe with a damp sponge I find > > that area does not take stain as dark as the rest of the wood. I am making > > raised panel doors and if I let the glue dry around the cope joints it is > > impossible to remove. Should I stain before glue up? > > > I have made many doors /panels and just clean up with a damp rag and make > sure all xcess glue is removed .After it is perfectly dry I final sand and > stain the doors .Never had a problem with this procedure .Glue , I use > tightbond > >
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IMHO there is no single answer, e.g. using a sharp chisel to scrape of partially hardened glue may not be possible due to access & angle of attack constraints. However, using a "damp" sponge or rag will surely not work. If you are going to remove the squeeze out with a rag or sponge, it has to be WET, almost soaking WET, and you have to SCRUB at the glue, or wou will have the staining problems you describe.
Staining before glue up works well but do not allow any stain to get on the mating surfaces of the glue joint.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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However, using a "damp" sponge or rag will surely

Not so or I have been very lucky for the last 28 years. I use a wet rag 95% of the time, even with red oak, and have no problems at all.
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I think we agree here... i.e. you cant just take a damp rag and wipe it over the glue. It has to be a WET rag, wet enough to get all the glue off of the surface.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Actually, Yes we do agree. I got the wrong impression the first time I read your response.
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snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net says...

I've tried. However, I almost invariably find I failed to get all the glue from some part (usually small) of the surface.
Does anyone have a way to test that ALL the glue has been removed before it sets up enough to hamper stain absorption?
Thanks, Tex
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says...

Pay closer attention. ;~) Actually IIRC Titebond makes a glue that will glow under a black light. If you miss spots during clean up the black light will make those spots stick out like a sore thumb.
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Sure, do what woodworkers have done for ages. Wipe with some mineral spirits - something which is not water-soluble - and the remainder will reveal itself.
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the occasional leftover glue splotch. I never ran across using mineral spirits as a tattle tale before -- my sheltered life, I guess. :-)
Will the mineral spirits affect staining later? If any glue shows up, can I go back to water and get if off?
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Won't affect stains, because you'll let them evaporate before staining. Oil stains might even contain some.
I'm sure you don't want to go back to water. It's scrape and sand after the stuff has dried. Be sure and scrape easy and sand one grit back from final or you'll have a burnished area where the stain won't absorb like the non-burnished.
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Once again, dilution the solution to pollution.
I scrape the leathery squeeze after 20 minutes, personally. Not vigorously, lest I pick up and dig out some wet wood.
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