Glue Rcommendation - Cutting Board

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That's my opinion as of now. I think I'll add some Gorilla Glue into the mix as well, for the sake of comparison. I'm betting that GG does better than T3.....any takers?
JP
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wrote:

OK, I've glued up 3 sets each of T1, T2, T3 and Gorilla Glue, and am planning on soaking them tomorrow. What time intervals do you think I should attempt to break them at? I'm thinking the first set after 4 hours, the second after 12, and the third after 24 or 48. Does this sound reasonable?
JP
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wrote:

What if you clamped one end horizontally to a bench and tied a rope around the other end with a weight hanging on it? Add weight until something breaks.
-- John, in Minnesota
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First thought is to check the water temperature. Another is to give an extended cure time, just to be sure. Also, if you're going to stress with increasing weight until the joint fails, I'd include a test board for each glue, which did _not_ get soaked in water.
I also suspect most wet-failures are gradual. That the glue becomes more plastic, and becomes subject to creep and slow fracture. IOW, a much smaller (than load limit) weight when applied for several hours might well pull apart the joint. This could happen even if the soaked board showed the same weight limit as the unsoaked one.
Yet another factor, once you've found some failures, is if some of the strength returns when the wood is fully dry again. GerryG
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I know that the Titebond III container says "Waterproof" right on the front of it, but it also says "Not for continuous submersion or for use below the waterline". That sounds more like "water resistant" that "waterproof".
Wayne
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I know that testimonial evidence is always suspect however, I made a Maple cutting board and knife holder some 15 years ago and they have held up to virtually daily use with no problems. Edge glued only with yellow carpenters glue, I don't remember the actual brand.
It is after all only a cutting board.
Dave
PS The last one I made, I did use Titebond 3. I'll check back in another 15 years and let you know if its still holding up.
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Probably just fine. But Titebond 3 is supposed to be absolutely wonderful, making you look 20 years younger, 20 pounds lighter, reverse global warming, and sort out all the discord in the Middle East. Or something like that.
It's a cutting board. Use almost any glue in your shop with the maple, and you're going to get 10 years of hard use. Secure the laminations with dowels during your glue up, assuming edge or long grain orientation, and it will likely outlive you, no matter how old you are today.
IMO, the accuracy of the flattening of the to be glued surfaces is probably more critical than the choice of glue.
Patriarch
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

Any thoughts on biscuits as opposed to dowels? I am not sure I could drill accurately enough w/o a drill press.
--
Al Reid

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know
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drill accurately enough w/o a drill press.

Neither. Just apply glue and clamp the boards. Consider this. Glue in general is stronger than the wood itself when used in line with the grain. Most often if the glue and or joint is not compromised the wood breaks before the glued joint line. Dowels and or biscuits simply reinforce and make the wood itself stronger and add more strength when attaching a piece by it's end grain. Biscuits will assist in alignment in any application and dowels work better when attaching long pieces of wood at their ends where the glue does not hold well at all.
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Leon,
Ok, I will just use glue. BTW, what was your recommended glue?
--
Al Reid

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The cutting board that I made in Jr. High in 1969 is still holding up well with being soaked daily. At that time I used Weld Wood. This was a dry power glue that you mixed with water.
Since, there have been many water proof glues that are easier to use. Titebond 3 will probably be great for this application. I do not recommend the #2 as I have had a butcher block fail at the joints that were in fact reinforced with 3/4" dowels. I built that butcher block in 1980 and 6 years later the joints began to fail. This butcher block saw a lot of use and water. The dowels did not prevent failure of the joint, they simply prevented the butcher block from falling apart then the joint failed. Still, the butcher block was useless. #2 is "Weather Resistant", not "Water Proof". The Titebond #3 is stated as being water proof.
I'd go with Titebond #3.
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As a P.S here, as with any thing you glue, be sure to totally cover the surface to be glued with glue. Do not just run a wavy bead of glue on the surface. Coat the entire surface. You can spread the glue with a stiff piece of plastic similar to a credit card.
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Leon,
Thanks for the input. I guess I will go out and get some TiteBond III.
I always use an acid brush to spread the glue. The credit card may, however, be a better option in this case.
--
Al Reid

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however, be a better option in this case.
LOL, I almost always use that type brush and I plunk it into a glass of water to keep it from drying out during the day.
The credit card is faster on wide surfaces.

know
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On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 15:08:16 GMT, "Leon"

I've been using a 4" long bolt attached to a handle to spread glue on edges lately. It really works well - and I think that someone here on the wreck wreckommended it. The threads sort of smear out the glue into an evenly lined coat. Sort of like a pair of corduroys. Thanks!
JP
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Titebond 2 is water resistant, should work fine if you are not soaking the cutting board, but Titebond 3 is basically WaterProof
John
On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 13:00:27 -0400, "Al Reid"
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Look at the Titebond 2 bottle again, it is "Weather Resistant", not Water Resistant. Weather resistant could include dampness, heat, cold, sunlight.
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I have had #2 fail on a butcher block. The block did get a lot of use and was frequently wet. I would suggest a Water Proof rather than a Weather Resistant Glue.
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make a rather large cutting/chopping board. What is the

Personally I'd get online and do some research for a food-grade woodglue. But I also agree with j.duprie on using white school glue, safe for kids if they decide to eat some for a snack. Regular white glue is what used to be used in furniture factories, still very strong stuff. Besides, even if you soaked the finished and dried cutting board in water and it fell apart, the wood would be ruined by warping anyway.
Alex
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