Glue question

I have some paper to glue together, actually posterboard. Can I use TiteBond II on paper?
Or should I just use paper glue.
Steve
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wrote:

Maybe bookmark this: http://www.thistothat.com /
The other link doesn't work.
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"Steve B" wrote:

----------------------------------------- Ever hear of rubber cement?
Lew
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On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 23:03:50 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Is that for repairing condoms?
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Strictly at your own risk!
--
Stuart Winsor

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"Steve B" wrote in message
I have some paper to glue together, actually posterboard. Can I use TiteBond II on paper?
Or should I just use paper glue. ================================================================Paper is wood. It'll work fine.
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Any water-based glue may wrinkle your posterboard. Rubber cement is probably a better choice.
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On 4/15/12 9:09 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

A fabric/craft/art store will have and be able to recommend the right glue that won't curl the paper.
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-MIKE-

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Steve B wrote:

Go get a can of spray adhesive made for the purpose (paper); eg, 3M Super 77. Any art store, even Home Depot..
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dadiOH
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Titebond works fine, and it's a lot easier to control where it goes than 3m 77.
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the 155 is good old machine and as i said in my reply in a.r., I'd glue the foam together and to the wood then staple the canvas to the wood. When holding the staple gun, tilt it about 15 degrees or more to the left so the staple doesn't drive flush(one leg standing proud). Fit and adjust the cover until you like it, then staple flush while pulling the non flush staples
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On 6/25/12 9:18 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

3M Super77 works great for just about everything including foam. There is also spray adhesive from CRC (green can) at Harbor Freight that works great, has a better spray nozzle than 3M, and is on sale often for about 8 bucks.
I use a lot of foam to make road cases and spray adhesive is the best stuff for the task.
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I just start working it

Align the top & bottom centers of the fabric's edges with the centers of the seat board. Attach at a few places left and right of each center. You don't want to simply pull the fabric at each attaching point, with (say) your thumb and forefinger, you want to pet it, with your whole hand. You can "feel" the tension of the fabric over the surface and "feel" that the tension is consistant along the edge(s). You not only want to maintain good tension perpendicular to the edge, but also along the edge, i.e, maintain good tension front to back of the seat and right and left. Petting with your whole hand, rather than pulling at individual points with your thumb & forefinger, makes for the best smooth lay of the fabric, with good tension in all directions. With a little practice, you will understand what I mean by petting, this way, and you'll see the difference, in the lay of the fabric, when the 2 techniques are compared to one another. Pulling at individual points will often cause little bumps (uneven lay of the fabric) along the edges.
Additionally: There is/are specific foam(s) for boat seats and other outdoor use. "Regular" upholstery foam, for indoor furniture, is not recommended for outdoor use, boat seats, etc. Make sure you use the proper foam. I suppose you know to use treated ply (or treated whatever-wood) for the wood base. There are hard plastics, also, for seat bases, similar to 4-wheeler seats, motorcycle seats, etc., that are available.
You don't want to glue your fabric to any padding. There are many exceptions to this, these days, especially when it comes to headliners, side panels, auto seats, etc., where a thin foam or other thin padding is used and a stitching design is sewn onto the fabric application. This sewn application, sewn designing, is infamous with custom auto interiors and the like.
Sonny
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