Glue on Clamps

I have sinned -- Through several glueups I have accumulated a large amount of glue drips on the bars of my Bessey clamps. I am having trouble cleaning the glue and it is interfering with the operation of the clamps -- any advice to remove the glue ?
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Depends on the type of glue.
Titebond can be softened with vinegar or a heat gun. If it's Gorilla Glue, you might have a problem. I don't know *anything* that dissolves that stuff after it's dried. Scraping and picking would seem to be your best bet.
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 05:48:58 -0500, "Sam the Cat"

Hmmm. Whenever I get glue on a Bessey clamp, it can be chipped off using a putty knife, awl, or a thumbnail. I thought one advantage (of many) is that dried carpenter's glue doesn't stick to them easily.
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Phisherman responds:

Might not be a really terrible idea for him to lay on some Johnson's on the bars for the next time.
Charlie Self "He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire." Sir Winston Churchill
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I've got a question about that and other uses of wax such as putting it on a tablesaw surface. What are the chances that some of it will transfer to wood and affect the application of stain or some other finish?
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Steer clear of the waxes that contain silicon. These *can* transfer to wood. Johnson's paste wax seems to be a good option. Just apply, allow it to dry, then buff off. I've not had any problems transferring to wood.
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Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com Over 70 woodworking product reviews online! ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Jorgensen Cabinet Master Clamps - Sherwood Lathe Copy Attachment - Ryobi Right Angle Drill - Porter Cable COIL250 Coil Nailer - Ryobi 18v Cordless Jigsaw - Taunton's Complete Illustrated Guide to Furniture & Cabinet Construction ------------------------------------------------------------
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Woodcrafter wrote:

Buffing it out is the key. If you, say, slather it onto a plane sole, let it dry, forget about it, then, just for the sake of argument, mind you, pick it up a week later and try to plane something with it, you'll wind up having a rough time pushing it the first few strokes, and you'll smear wax all over the wood. Hypothetically. This has never happened to me, of course.
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 20:23:41 -0500, Silvan

Oh, but of course. Properly used, one applies the wax, lets dry for no more than 15 minutes (important note), and buffs well. Just for the sake of argument, you also must remove the iron before doing this or you will quickly find your buffing cloth and fingers mysteriously becoming much thinner and covered in RED bodily fluids. (No, there's no DAMHIKT here...for this one, anyway.)
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Upscale asks:

Not high. I've been waxing table tops for a lot longer than I want to recall right now and I do not recall wax as a source of finish problems from anything cut on them. Not to say I don't recall finish problems, but none that were wax-related or could even be pointed slightly in that direction.
Charlie Self "He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire." Sir Winston Churchill
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wrote:

aluminum... As far as I can tell, the only time I've had any transfer was once when I forgot to buff the new wax before using the table..
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wrote:

For me, the start of every finishing schedule is a thorough wipe down with naptha. (Especially if I've "tack-ragged" a project.) It de-waxes, de-oils, cleans; and it evaporates almost instantly.
Michael Baglio
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On 17 Dec 2004 13:55:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

So how many guys should come over for the "laying of the johnsons?" ;)
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Lazarus Long asks:

Depends on the guys' interests.
Charlie Self "He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire." Sir Winston Churchill
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I'll be damned if I'm going to put my Johnson in a clamp
Oh, you mean the wax, never mind.
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Slam the clampheads into it. They are rugged clamps - that's why you bought them.
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 05:48:58 -0500, "Sam the Cat"

could take it off with a plastic putty knife and rubber mallet...
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Wire brush in a drill will make short work of getting rid of the glue
John
On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 05:48:58 -0500, "Sam the Cat"

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Sam the Cat wrote:

Send those nasty, useless things to me for disposal and tell your wife to buy you new ones.
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I have a wire brush mounted on the end of a 1/4 hp motor. It does a fairly nice job of cleaning the worst of the glue off. I was pleasantly surprises the brush did not seem to hurt the finish on the Bessys any. I don't know how else one would get the stuff off. Walt

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Re: Glue on Clamps
wire brush on: bench grinderr 4" angle grinder die grinder
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