Glue is not stronger than wood.

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[snip]

Guess Who (IF that's his real name) is right.
If the glue was 'less' strong than the wood, at the break, there would be glue on either side of the break. As that never happens (Unless it was a piss-poor job of clamping and setting of the joint.) there usually is failed wood on either side of the break, but never failed glue. So the glue wins every time, end of story.
"IF" total structural integrity of the glued joint is compromised in a solid piece of the same material (everything else being equal theoretically) it wouldn't be the fault of the adhesive, but because the original board has been "cut" discontinuing the structure, NOT because it was glued. IOW.. the failure was set to take place at the moment of cutting, not at the moment of breaking after the adhesion process.
Imagine, if you will, a glue line of 1/8" thick, fully cured Glue (insofar that is possible to obtain in shit like PVA, but we're being hypothetical here), attached on both sides to wood, then break that lamination, and I assure you, the wood would give up parts to the adhesive, and the adhesive would stay in one piece.
Test this theory on end grain particle board (Legal in this argument as it negates any unpredictability). You will find the break to be either on the left side of the joint or the right, but never in the exact middle, most of the time a jagged break with material on either side.
As a countertop guy, this kinds stuff is important to me and I have tested that with every glue I have ever bought, I hate to get stuck with a 5 gallon pail of stuff that doesn't work.
To help a lot in making the joint stronger, one would be smart to lengthen the glue line by using TruMatch or finger joints, in the hope to restore some of the continuation of the 'cut' fibrous or granular structure of the wood in question.
Rob
The moon is smaller than the earth even though it is further away.
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Chuck wrote:

It sounds like you tested a glue joint that was not joined properly. I've never had a properly glued up panel break at the glue line when tested.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Have you tried it??

I've tried this at least three times. Everytime the glue line was left intact. However, a end-to-end grain is very weak.

Take some scraps and try it yourself. Allow the glue to cure for 2 days before swinging the sledge hammer. You'll become a believer.
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I guess I live in a more practical world. If I am designing a project that is going to be subjected to this kind of stress, use plywood! The strength difference between a solid and a glued up board would be so close, either could fail. Why take the chance? Who designes a project that close to failure points?
Dennis
Dennis
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I guess I live in a more practical world. If I am designing a project that is going to be subjected to this kind of stress, use plywood! The strength difference between a solid and a glued up board would be so close, either could fail. Why take the chance? Who designes a project that close to failure points?
Dennis
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