Glue for stavework mugs


I've been doing a bit of stavework and making drinking mugs, and haven't been able to find any consistent answers about glues on the web.
What I want to do is have a mug that is finished only with raw linseed oil, to make seem more of a historical-looking piece (e.g. no modern polyurethane or epoxy finish).
Because of this, I need to make sure my glue can stand up to some amount of liquid. In looking through the forum, there was some recent talk about TB III not being as waterproof at it seems it should (I got fooled by the label).
I would use polyurethane, but the stuff foams up inside the staves, and it's a pain to clean up on the inside. (Though I saw some references of glue scrapers... How would something like that work?)
The TB III I used on the first ones seems to be holding up ok, but I'm concerned about long-term exposure to water.
Does anyone have any light to shed on this?
Here's a pic of what I am making:
http://toysmakeuspowerful.com/mug-walnut-maple.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
quixote (in snipped-for-privacy@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com) said:
| I would use polyurethane, but the stuff foams up inside the staves, | and it's a pain to clean up on the inside. (Though I saw some | references of glue scrapers... How would something like that work?)
Polyurethane cleans up easily with acetone. Let the mug sit long enough for the acetone to completely evaporate before applying BLO.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BLO? Somebody might be using these things.
Morris Dovey wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Exactly... I'm using RLO :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
quixote wrote:

So raw is safe and boiled is poisonous?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Raw linseed oil is just that. Oil extracted from the Flax seed.
BLO is not "boiled". While boiling some oils does change their characteristics, BLO is RLO with several chemicals added to make it cure faster. The additives are almost all certainly poisonous. I have read some sources which claim that the poisonous heavy metals all get contained inside the finish when the linseed oil cures, but I wouldn't trust it after looking at all the nasties that get added.
You can buy food grade linseed oil (You can even buy it at health food stores as flax seed oil). It takes a few weeks to cure, but possible health concerns should be well worth it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: Raw linseed oil is just that. Oil extracted from the Flax seed.
: BLO is not "boiled". While boiling some oils does change their : characteristics, BLO is RLO with several chemicals added to make it : cure faster. The additives are almost all certainly poisonous. I have : read some sources which claim that the poisonous heavy metals all get : contained inside the finish when the linseed oil cures, but I wouldn't : trust it after looking at all the nasties that get added.
: You can buy food grade linseed oil (You can even buy it at health food : stores as flax seed oil). It takes a few weeks to cure, but possible : health concerns should be well worth it.
Tried & True makes a line of LO finishes that are made according to a 19th century recipe, by heating -- no driers added, but it's claimed it dries as fast as the stuff with driers.
Personally, for a drinking vessel, I'd use epoxy.
Or line it with metal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fri, Feb 17, 2006, 2:39am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@mint.u.arizona.edu (AndrewBarss) <snip> Or line it with metal. How about beeswax? Wooden Civil War canteens used that. Probably others too. Or, I suppose you could line it with Titebond II, or a similar food-safe glue. I'd prefer to stay from metal.
JOAT I'm busy now, can I ignore you some other time?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Great for cold, not so good for coffee, etc

--
--------------------------------------------------------
Personal e-mail is the n7bsn but at amsat.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fri, Feb 17, 2006, 7:44am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@callsign.net (RalphELindberg) doth wonder: Ever tried to drink a hot drink from a metal cup.....
Not only tried, have done it on many occassions. I learned to drink from a cup when I was 2 or 3.
JOAT IThere is no vaccine against stupidity!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 02:39:15 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss

Lead?
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Douglass (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 02:39:15 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss
|| || Personally, for a drinking vessel, I'd use epoxy. || || Or line it with metal. | | Lead?
Sodium!
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 02:39:15 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss
:> :>Personally, for a drinking vessel, I'd use epoxy.:> :>Or line it with metal. : Lead?
Nope, I was thinking steel.
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andrew Barss wrote:

302 stainless steel one presumes. Lead-free pewter might be easier. You can buy it in sheets that could (I think) be cold rolled over a form and the seams soldered with lead-free solder.
Be aware that most (maybe all) epoxies have a 'glass transition temerature' around 150 F. They soften at that temperature and do not regain their properties when cooled.
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Tape the inside staves with blue masking tape. The glue will foam up attached to the tape. Remove the tape.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That looks like what some people I know in Oregon make, except their staves tapper.
I do understand the desire not to use a modern finish, but allow me to explain why I do... I never know what people are going to drink and I don't know the reaction that liquid would have with linseed oil and the componds in the wood. Second, even walnut and maple wood have some compounds in them that some people might react to. The people in Oregon also was a number of "exotics", which increase the chances that people could react to the wood. The result is, an interior finish that is stable and safe. Also, in my experience, raw linseed oil never seems to completely harden.
Of course, an authentic mug would not be glued at all. The mug would be coopered, much like a barrel. There really isn't a good glue for this, until the modern glues were invented.
TTFN Ralph
--
--------------------------------------------------------
Personal e-mail is the n7bsn but at amsat.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ralph E Lindberg wrote:

Especially walnut. It is not uncommon for woodworkers to develop an allergy to walnut.
Epoxy would seeem to be the glue of choice for the staves. Cured Epoxies should be pretty resistant to any chemicals found in a beverage.
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

--
--------------------------------------------------------
Personal e-mail is the n7bsn but at amsat.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 30 Jan 2006 09:59:08 -0800, "quixote"

I am no expert. However, I have three stave-built things in the house. Two ;tankaard-style mugs and a small bucket. I watched one of the mugs being assembled. No glue. So far as I know, neither of the other two uses glue either and it was certainly not the norm for barrels. FWIW, the tankards I have were made in Japan. I'll post a picture if you like.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
areyoukidding wrote:

Certainly if they were completely period, there wouldn't be glue used and they would be coopered. I'd certainly be interested in photos of the tankards :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.