Glue for rubberized cork?

I am building up a grip with rubberized cork on top of wood. I have used titebond III for this before but sometimes there will be a spot that does not stick -- probably rubber on rubber. I am using plastic spring clamps so I would prefer that the glue not stick to plastic. So what I am looking for is a glue that sticks to wood and rubberized cork but not to plastic or metal.
I have also used masking tape as a clamp for making repairs but it tends to smear the glue under the tape.
Any suggestions?
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Contact cement. It is the adhesive of choice for cork.
R
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Thanks to both of you! I already have wax and contact cement, but did not know that they were the right stuff for rubberized cork.
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The generic contact cement that you'd get in a craft/hardware store, such as Weldwood brand, is fine. The 3M stuff made for the automotive industry, such as FastTack, is great stuff. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
R
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<snip>

I use Pliobond contatc cement for small jobs. Two comments: the fumes are nasty, and the shelf life once the bottle has been opened is not that good. I usually have to buy a new bottle for every project that requires it, having discovered the remains from the previous job are shot. Of course I only need it every year or two, but when you need it, nothing else I've found works better.
Doug White
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I've never used Pliobond and I'm wondering about the shelf life. I have a tube of 3M Fast Tack that's probably ten years old (it lasts a long time when you're only gluing bike tires with that tube) and the stuff still works fine - no noticeable age-related degradation. What happens to the Pliobond when it gets old?
R
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The version I've used came in a screw cap bottle. Once you open it the first time, the solvent (which is VERY volatile) begins to evaporate. I'm not sure about the new stuff, but it used to come with a brush inside the cap. The symptom of it being unusuable is when you can't get the brush out of the bottle.
A tube might last longer because the leakable area of the seal is a lot smaller. I noticed that they sell Piobond in small tubes as well, but I don't recall seeing it for sale in that form. I probably never noticed because I'm used to looking for the bottles.
Doug White
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In article <a5f673d7-58b8-4570-b89b-280495aeb875

There is this substance known as "wax". Apply it to your clamps and anything else to which you do not want the glue to stick and you can use pretty much any kind of glue you want to. Johnson Paste Wax or Butchers Bowling Alley Wax work fine--Home Depot carries Johnson's, any real hardware store should have one or the other or both. Use two coats. Do not use car wax--many of them contain silicone, which in woodworking can cause a variety of problems.
As to glue, try either e6000 or 3M Weatherstrip adhesive. Sand the rubber and clean with naphtha. You can get e6000 at most craft stores, and 3M Weatherstrip Adhesive at most auto parts stores.
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