Glue for maple to maple?

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Hello all,
I am soon to take the round out of my maple boards on jointer and through the thicknesser. Then I will use hand saw to cut in dog holes, and drill holes for front-to-back rods (fully threaded or end threaded).
But this maple is hard rock sugar, very hard and *glassy* so I am curious about which glue to use, 202GF, 2002GF, TB-II, TB-II extend, yellow, white, epoxy, super glue (lol), school glue, school paper paste...???
Should I score or rough up the sides with sand paper before gluing? Maybe with a toothing blade (not that I have one, of course)?
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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I have used Gorilla glue and garden variety yellow glue. I don't see much difference.
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Yeah? Doing smooth hard maple to smooth hard maple? Facing to facing?
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Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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Sat, Jan 28, 2006, 6:17pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@notquite.net (AAvK), or someone, did burble: <snip> But this maple is hard rock sugar, very hard and *glassy* so I amcurious about which glue to use, 202GF, 2002GF, TB-II, TB-II extend, yellow, white, epoxy, super glue (lol), school glue, school paper paste...??? <snip>
You had to ask? Maple syrup.
JOAT You only need two tools: WD-40, and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the tape.
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--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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Sun, Jan 29, 2006, 11:18am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@notquite.net (AAvK) now asketh: What about good ol' yellah gloo?
Well shure, if ya wanna be picky. Doesn't taste as good tho.
JOAT You only need two tools: WD-40, and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the tape.
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Plain 'ol yellow glue works well.
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Regular yellow glue works for me.
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AAvK wrote:

Come on! you can't beat yellow carpenters glue unless you need waterproof. The smoother the surface and the better the fit, the stronger the joint.
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OK thanks! But what about biscuits for aligning the boards, would that weaken it? And, read my reply to Leon.
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Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
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I never use biscuits when edge joining boards. I don't have problems with alignment so I never saw the need.
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On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 14:20:55 -0800, "Frank Drackman"

Same here.
I use waxed cauls in the middle and c-clamps and pillow blocks on the on the ends to ensure alignment.
Melamine scraps make great glue-proof pillow blocks
Barry
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AAvK wrote:

Sure it will weaken it, but not significantly. The purpose of biscuits is alignment and if you need something for alignment, use it. I personally use a spline of 1/4" plywood for alignment and have never had any problems.
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Explain how biscuits will weaken it. I don't see how.

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Max Mahanke wrote:

fit reduces the strength. I imagine that if you get a perfect match all around the insert (full contact), there would be no reduction in strength, but full contact is not likely because each biscuit would require 3 contact surfaces on each board. Nonetheless, everything that I have read indicates that the strength of a perfectly flat contact is equal to or superior to any other surface with splines, dowels, biscuits, etc. That said, the difference in strength will never make any difference for most cabinet or other home type woodwork.
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I guess, but the biscuit is designed to swell by absorbing the water based glue (that's why they don't work well with urethane glues) so I wonder if 'contact' is an really an issue. I've seen them used on MDF where they swelled enough to ghost thru to the surface. Don't get me wrong, I'm not a fan of biscuits except for butt joints when the extra work of a mortise and tenon doesn't seem justified (mother-in-law projects). And because the slot is slightly larger than the biscuit to allow for expansion, in my experience they're not that good for allignment. I'm back to the way I was taught 100 years ago using cauls.

I agree, that same 100 years ago, our first project was to hand edge joint two boards and glue them with white, not yellow glue. The next session the shop teacher would break them over his knee to demonstrate that if they were properly jointed, the glue joint was stronger than the surrounding wood. If they broke on the glue joint it was, start again.

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Just like a tennon in a mortise a tennon joint weakens it. :)

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I made a counter top out of 2x2x48 strips of maple which I joined with biscuits and Titebond II yellow glue. It's only been a year, but it's worked great so far. I posted some pictures. They're in reverse chronological order, so start with Page 3 first.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jcaron2/search/tags:sideboard/?page=3 http://www.flickr.com/photos/jcaron2/search/tags:sideboard/?page=2 http://www.flickr.com/photos/jcaron2/search/tags:sideboard/?page=1
Josh
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That's a nice piece of work, thanks. Read my reply to Leon.
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Take your pick. I would use the most common to woodworking.

NO. The thicker the glue gap the weaker the joint. Just make sure you spread the glue out over the entire surface and don't just squirt out a bead and let the clamps spread the glue.

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