glue application


I need to apply wood glue to the edge of a 5/8 board and I don't want any rundown the panel sides. I would like to find a tool that would be guided by the board edge and apply a very straight bead of wood glue. Any idea where to find a tool like that???
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In my experience (not that I have a lot of it, mind you! :-) ) oozing glue is more a matter of putting too much in the joint, not how straight the bead is. If you're really worried about glue running out of the joint and onto your wood, you could use some masking tape on either side of the joint and pull it off when it's partially dry.
That said, you could probably make something like what you're talking about on your own with a couple of scraps of plywood screwed together.
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Seems way easier to make something than to buy it.
Cut a 5/8" dado in a scrap of wood so that it can run across the top of your boards. Cut a small groove at one end so that the tip of your glue bottle can rest in it while you slide it along the length.
If you're really concerned, you might want to try this:
Tilt your tablesaw blade to 45, raise it just BARELY above the level of the table, and rip two small v-grooves in the edge, about 1/16" from either side. Then when you squeeze them together, the excess glue has a place to collect without oozing out the sides.
The 5/8" edge of the board would look like this: -v-------------v-
Josh
jctrinity wrote:

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Josh wrote:

I've done that a couple of times, but I think the grooves are too wide and compromise the strength of the join, especially on 4/4 stock. I tried with a pointed router bit and that worked better, but it's still doing it the hard way.
Either prefinish the surfaces, in which case the squeezeout will pop off easily, or use the blue "painter's tape" on both surfaces before gluing.
Alternatively, if the piece is narrow enough to go through your jointer, glue it up before surfacing to thickness.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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All I have every used to guide my glue bottle has been my finger. I have very straight glue lines.
Bruce
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Your steady hand. Practice makes perfect. Then spread it out with a small disposable brush.
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As others have stated the straightness of the glue line is not important. I personally level out the glue across the edge.
As for preventing runs, I use the "mask it" method. If there is sufficient glue, there will be runs. I use the 3M Blue masking tape when I want to protect a finish. It does not leave glue residue, is a breeze to apply and remove, and can prevent any issues from the run.
Dave Paine.

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I picked up on a glue tip from watching Wood Works on DIY. He often uses a roller to apply glue. The problem is finding the roller. I searched all the lumber yards and woodworking stores for a solution and had no luck. I was always directed toward the laminate rollers. I finally found one at a craft store. It was in the stencil section. It is a rubber roller about four inches long. It works quite well. In your application I would roll it over some glue spread out on a piece of paper and then roll it onto the piece. It really gives a very even coat and works great for edge joining boards.
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jctrinity wrote:

Cut the bristles of a flux brush to 1/2 length and spread the glue with it.
Barry
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