Glue and a chisel question

Been meaning to ask about the difference between Titebond 1-2-3. The only thing different is a slight variation in hold time and the waterproof vs water resistant issue. I buy and use pint size containers, and am wondering if there is any reason not just to settle on titebond 3 as the glue of choice. Cost of glue is not a factor for me. Are there situations where tb-1 or tb-2 is a better choice?????
And a thought on chisel sharpness. I have some L-V chisels that I sharpen till they shave the arm hairs with a small micro bevel. For hand use, esp with the grain, they cut like butter. When used with a mallet to finish a mortice or other cross grain stuff, they seem to dull quickly. Should I sharpen a chisel differently for different uses? Angle to 35 degrees? or stop at the 4000 grit stone?
Any ideas or comments would be appreciated.
Regards, Rich.....
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rich wrote:

There is some difference in strength--1 & 2 are somewhat stronger than 3 in test results I've seen. The difference in open time and lower chalk temperature w/ 3 is the biggest advantage (other than the water resistance, of course) if there's a reason for considering that important.
In summary, if you don't have a reason for choosing, it probably makes no difference in reality. If you have a reason, you will know it... :)

Forget the micro-bevel for hard use.
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On Thu, 06 Mar 2008 09:35:04 -0600, dpb wrote:

I've also found that 3 is a little thicker and doesn't run as much. That combined with the longer open time made it my glue of choice.
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"rich" wrote ...

Indeed ... the color of the glue line, and the length of "open time", can be a deciding factors in which you use for a certain projects.

IME, most general purpose chisel bevels seem to come in at around 25 degrees, although I sharpen mine to 20 with at 5 degree secondary bevel to get to the 25 degree cutting edge.
YMMV with the application and the type of wood you use. Experiment.
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I've found Titebond 3 to be more viscous and harder to spread easily --- So, if the work doesn't either a water resistant or waterproof joint, I stick (is that a pun?) with Titebond 1.

I heard heard shaved, hairless forearms called "woodworker's pattern baldness".
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A few years back Wood magazine conducted a glue test. TB III was less water resistant than TB II. Yeah, less water resistant. To you and me the term "Water Proof" does not apply. In the silly "Water Proof" standards test the only place you see "Water Proof" is in the name of the test. From there on the description in the test only mentions "Water Resistance" BUT because the test is/was call the "Water Proof " test it is labeled Water Proof" on the front label. You have heard the old saying, They give it to you in the large print and take it away from you in the small print. Read the TBIII back label and it states, Passes ANSI/HPVA Type I water-resistance.
I only choose TB III over the "yellow" glue because it dries to a medium brown color when I work with medium brown woods. I prefer the dark tinted glues for walnut and am anxiously waiting to test the new WHITE Gorilla PVA glue on woods like Maple.
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rich wrote:

For paring you can go with shallower angles, as there is less force on the cutting edge.
For chopping mortises a 30-35 degree angle is better as it gives more support to the cutting edge. It's generally sufficient to use a high-angle microbevel with a shallower primary bevel (see the Ray Iles english-style chisels, for instance).
Chris
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RE: Glue. Like someone else said I use TB II for most cases unless I want the darker finish of TB III.

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rich wrote:

I forgot to mention this earlier...for me the biggest benefits of TBIII are the lower chalk temperature (useful for winter glue-ups up here in the frozen north) as well as the longer open time.
Chris
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Hi I like titebond 3 for any outdoor projects. I use Titebound 1 for indoor projects. On chisels, I like to get mine as sharp as I can. Are you digging out mortises with them? Randy
http://nokeswoodworks.com
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Randy, Thanks for the input. Mortices do get dug. I usually use a drill press to hog out most, then clean up sides and ends. But I have done without the drill. It works, but a drill is easier.
And to all, Thanks for all the input. I have some TB3 right now, so I guess I'll stick with it. I have not noticed any flow or application problems but have worried about work time. Next project is a corner cabinet in Fir. If I build the wife furniture, she buys the wood, and "required" tools. I keep the scrap and the tools. There is ALWAYS scrap!
One - Sweet - Deal !
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You da man! Where did you find a wife like that? Wish my wife would pay for the wood..... I agree, you have one sweet deal Randy http://nokeswoodworks.com
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On Thu, 06 Mar 2008 07:30:06 -0800, rich wrote:

TB III works well and the color tends to be less obvious.
As regards chisel bevels, I grind a 20 degree bevel. I can then set up a "micro" bevel at any angle I want very quickly, just a few strokes on the stone does it. Twenty-five degrees is good for paring but tends to be a little weak for chopping.
Duster
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Hi Rich, Re. glue, I've used TBIII exclusively for the last year or so, and haven't found any drawbacks yet. At the scale I work, the price difference per project is insignificant.
Re. the LN chisels, I've heard that those in particular seem to require a higher bevel than most. Even up to 35* might be necessary to prevent premature edge failure - I'd probably do a primary bevel at 25*, and try a microbevel at about 35 and see how that goes. OTOH, if you're chopping a lot of mortises, you'll probably want some dedicated mortise chisels! Or just keep these LNs for paring, and get something else for general chopping use - other brands (or types of steel) seem to do better at edge retention with lower bevel angles.
HTH! Andy
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Or just keep these LNs for paring, and get something

I didn't think about a use for the other chisels I have, Stanleys that I first bought. Maybe I'll do them at 35 degrees and dedicate them to mortising. I knew there was a solution!
Thanks for the input!
Regards, Rich.....
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rich wrote:

Why not use an actual mortising chisel such as:
http://www.hartvilletool.com/product/11707
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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that 1-2 metric sizes would probably work. I never seem to end up with sizes like 0.500 or 1.250 anyway. Looks like something for birthday unless... I "need" one for the next project!
Thanks for the input.....
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