Glue


What is the best glue for making furnature like the misison bed I have been talking about?
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Titebond 2 or any of it's competitors like elmer's. You want a yellow wood glue. You could also use a polyurethane glue like gorilla glue, but I've never used them before. I hear that their open times are longer which can help with a big glue-up, that they foam instead of squeezing out which is harder to clean up, and if you get it on your hands, you're branded for life.
Clamp everything.
You know, it really sounds like you need to take two months off from woodworking and just watch the new yankee workshop and woodworks. Those shows are priceless.
brian
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x-no-archive:yes
I have watched those. I also have books which I read daily. But there is nothing like hearing from experts out there..
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Agreed - titebond II is a great all-purpose, fairly inexpensive glue. Somewhat water resistant, which shouldn't matter for indoor furniture. That's what I'm using for most of the joints on my current bed project. Fairly short open time, though. I like Gorilla glue (or some other brand of polyurethane glue that costs less than Gorilla) for some things - the longer open time (20-30 min instead of 5 min with TBII) is helpful. I think the foaming is actually easier to clean up - it's fairly soft, and doesn't seem to soak into wood and interfere with finishing as much as yellow glue. If you wash your hands before it dries, it's not too bad. One important thing to note with polyurethane glue - it needs moisture to cure. If the air is very moist, that's probably enough, but it usually helps to lightly moisten one or both surfaces prior to glueing. Good luck and keep reading, Andy
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 11:18:23 -0800, stryped opined:

Nope. There is nothing like doing it the first time. Suddenly, all the books and experts' advice will make sense to you in a new way. "Lay back and enjoy it."
--
wreck20051219 at spambob.net


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brianlanning wrote:

Whats wrong with using TiteBond Original?
--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Titebond offers a slow set (Extend?) yellow glue. Also Titebond III advertises a longer open time altho its more expensive and you don't really need it to be waterproof. Gorilla glue? Its almost impossible to avoid the foam out and if your taking about glueing all those slats on the bed you may not live long enough to scrape it all off once it cures. I know stair guys who use Gorilla glue for custom laminated bent rails for both its longer open time and the fact that it will not creep under tension like yellow glue when cured. But its a lot easier to scrape off a continuous surface than around that many joints.

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Extend is white.

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White, yellow - There's more to it than that. http://www.titebond.com/IntroPageTB.ASP?UserType=1&ProdSel=ProdSelectorIntroTB.asp I guess I should have been more specific, I was referring to Titebond II Extend which is a PVA Type II 'yellow' glue. The original Extend is an Aliphatic Resin glue and is also yellow but not water resistant. In either case, we're talking 15 min. vrs the 5 min open time of premium Titebond II at about the same bond strength.

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I've got a bottle of it right here. I guess if I look close enough, it does have a slight yellow tinge. Nothing like the regular stuff though.

have
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Woodworker's yellow glue. If you are using a dark wood such as walnut, there are "dark" woodworker's glues available. I like Elmer's (my personal preference) or Titebond. Although very strong, wood glue is no substitute for a well-made slightly snug-fitting joint.
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