glue

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Sorry to bring up and old, old subject, but what do most of you use to glue up case goods or furniture? My personal favorite was Elmer's yellow carpenter glue and I keep a bottle of it in my present, tiny, workshop. I liked the strength, open time, reasonable moisture resistance and the fact that after clamping, a damp rag would clean up squeeze-out so the wood would still take stain. (It also was "scrapable" and could be popped off after drying.) There's probably little difference between Elmer's and Tightbond, but I just got used to buying Elmer's in the gallon bottle and refilling my little dispensers with it.
I've also used Gorilla glue here on some melamine board shelving and it's not too bad. I don't care for getting it off my fingers, though.
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I have use many types of wood glue through the years and because all modern glues are pretty much going to do exactly what you want I make my choice as to the color the glue will be when cured.
Yellow glue if I don't care what the joint will look like or will be painting over.
"White" Gorilla glue, not polyurethane, for light colored woods as this glue dries clear.
TBIII for medium to darker woods, it dries to a dark brown color.
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Leon wrote:

If you use Gorilla Glue for biscuits joints is there a problem with the wood splitting from the expansion of the glue.
I am using 1 X 2 material.
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Keith Nuttle wrote: ...

...
If you mean that foaming polyurethane crap, I'd not use it for anything of the sort.
It has some very minimal uses where need the water resistance but it's not worth beans for anything else. Tests show the polyurethanes aren't as strong as the yellow glues so the "gorilla" stuff is just marketing...add to the foaming the cleanup and all and there's just no place for it other than really specific uses...
Ask, and I'll tell ya' what I _really_ think about it... :)
$0.02, etc., etc., etc., ...
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You need to be more specific as which Gorilla Glue you are talking about. However if you are talking about the polyurethane glue I seriousely doubt you would see a problem regardless if its application. If it expanded so much to split wood it seems to reason it would push joints apart also. I don't think it is going to happen. This is not an expanding foam sealer that you commonly see around windows and door jams.
However the white glue or regular wood glues would be a better choice. Biscuits work by expanding when they absorbe moisture from the glue. Typically the polyurethane glue uses moisture to cure, the glue itself probably will not cause a biscuit to properly expand.
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RE: Subject
TBII for typical wood working joints.
Epoxy for long open time joints or where gap filling is required.
Gorilla glue is the most overpriced under peckered product on the planet IMHO.
Totally worthless.
HTH
Lew
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Have you ever use the Gorilla "WHITE" glue? I find it pretty good and works exactly like the typical TB water based wood glue. IIRC cheaper than TBIII.
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"Leon" wrote:

No.
Haven't used TBIII either.
Around here, if TBII doesn't do the job, it's time for epoxy.
Lew
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On Thu, 03 Dec 2009 13:24:37 -0800, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I sometimes use III where II would do because of its longer open time and because it doesn't run as much.
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@verizon.net says...

NB: I do not live in North America, so things may be different here.
First time I came across 'gorilla glue' it was that red foaming stuff sold in squeeze bottles. And yes, I agree: totally useless crap. The few times I used it the joints just popped after a period of time.
On the other hand, there's the white/clear 'gorilla grip' that is sold in cartidges suitable for caulking guns. This stuff does hardly foam so long as you don't use it on wet wood. And it holds very very well indeed. Seems like another animal entirely. Have to anticipate problems with creep during glue up - it can be as slippery as axle grease. Also it doesn't wash off the fingers like white glue and you have to use a spreader rather than a stiff brush - otherwise I'd use it a lot more than I do. But it's a superior product, and I prefer it for any kind of kitchen table/benchtop/chopping board that gets wet or even hot&wet regularly, since I have difficulty finding aerolite308 these days.
f.w.i.w. -P.
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Peter Huebner wrote: ...

Think??? <vbg>

The gorilla US web site doesn't seem to show that--I'd not realized they had even introduced a wood glue but in looking it appears it's a white PVA glue that meets ANSI Type I/II tests for water resistance (a la Titebond II and III) which not any other white PVA does afaik.
A quick search didn't find an online price for it except for another quick-set version of the same glue in 2-oz bottles that seemed pretty pricey and not particularly useful for general woodworking.
They didn't have a lot of technical details concerning it; in particular I looked but saw no mention of the chalk temperature for comparison.
But, as a PVA glue, it certainly would not have the dastardly foaming characteristics of the polyurethanes nor the cleanup hassles. Oh, it did have a pretty short clamp time w/ a 5-10 min open time.
--
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says...

The Gorilla Grip I was writing about is not a white/pva/aliphatic type glue, it's a polyurethane based one.
http://www.holdfast.co.nz/pages/product_details.aspx?pid 075&psid20075
It's sold as a construction glue, 2 hour cure, will stick to wood, treated timber, concrete,wallboard, mdf, formica, brick, polystyrene ... but not polyethylene or polypropylene.
Incidentally, the working temperature range given is impressive: -30 to +100 Celsius.
I'd be surprised if it's not sold in the us/ca area, but maybe under a different product name - however: this stuff has the gorilla glue logo all over it, and it's infinitely superior to the red foamy 'gorilla glue'.
-P.
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Peter Huebner wrote: ...

...
Interesting -- there's no hint of such a product on the US Gorilla glue site--they have only four glue products listed -- the red foamy crap, an epoxy, a cyano-superglue and the aforementioned white pva wood glue.
--
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Snip
Any glue in a 2 oz configuration is going to be pricey. I have been buying Gorilla Glue White for a couple of years now.
Home Depot sells The White Gorilla Glue in 18oz containers for $5.97. I would call that pretty cheap.
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&productId0662003&langId=-1&catalogId053&ci_sku0662003&ci_src110944&cm_mmc=shopping-_-googlebase-_-D24X-_-100662003
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Leon wrote: ...

My point...I didn't see anything else show up in a (very) quick google just to try to satisfy my curiosity...

About what Titebond I/II are, indeed, and less than III...
No HD or other big boxes here; have not seen it at the local building supply where they keep the original stuff on the checkout counters...the ads do seem to work...
--
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Where is here, can yo order on line? Rockler, and HD will ship.
I see that Walmart has it also, in Houston.
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Leon wrote: ...

Far SW KS. Could, is it really sufficiently better than TB II/III to make paying shipping worth it since can get them both in whatever quantity container desired (at least up to 5 gal pails) locally?

That's worse than dealing w/ HD!!! :) Do have one o' them; I avoid it as much as possible altho occasionally it becomes about the only place for some things (not generally hardware-related, though). They're surely the pits for what they do overall to product availability/choice in small towns (to throw in the obligatory editorial comment...).
Anyway, would you feel deprived to give up Gorilla white pva in favor of TB and if so, why? Perhaps I'd throw a a container in another mail order next time something comes up if were. The ANSI I/II water-resistance together is some advantage I can see in the architectural work where I typically use TB III now. Wish I did know the chalk temperature as that often seems to be an issue come fall or early spring which is when often either trying to beat real winter or get jump before field work really hits in spring.
I'm off doing the barn roof/repaint as the major project to fill-in work when there's a break as did get the new roof on and the whole thing at least primed. Still most of the doors need redone, all the windows need built or rebuilt for the ones that still have a window in the opening, the haymow floor, ... Probably still be at it when I'm 80 at the rate it gets attention now... :)
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to answer that question, I don't know as foar as what you consider to be better. If you saw what I mentioned in an earlier post, most all of the yellow, white, and tan glues work well enough. I prefer to use the Gorilla white on lighter woods and the joint line is less apparent, it dries clear. I prefer the TBIII for oak and darkers woods, it dries dark brown. and I prefer yellow glue when I don't care either way what the joint looks like.
Typically however I do care what the joint looks like.

That's worse than dealing w/ HD!!! :) Do have one o' them; I avoid it

I know! LOL.

Absolutely not except for the reason mentioned above. Cured color is whay I choose one over the other.
Perhaps I'd throw a a container in another mail

Typically because I mostly work with oak and darker woods I use the TB III more often too.
Wish I did know

I bet an e-mail to Gorillaglue.com would answer your questions.

Have fun!
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Leon wrote: ...

...
That answers the question fully ... the performance is essentially the same afay(ou're)c(oncerned/care) other than aesthetics. In that case, I'll probably just stick w/ TB; could see a change only if it had some additional advantages such as tack or much quicker clamp time, etc.
In general, I find the glue line thin enough it isn't obvious enough in a finished piece to matter what the glue color itself was, but I don't use much really light wood in glueups where it would be terribly noticeable.

Probably -- doubt it could be enough lower than TB III given it's a PVA that it would matter, though.
Thanks, was the answer was looking for... :)
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"Leon" wrote:

Not compared to TBII at about $20/gal.
Lew
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