Gloat and advice needed

Today, I finally bought a bandsaw which I have been wanting forever. I purchased a cast iron Delta/Rockwell bandsaw at a garage sale for $50.00. Along with it I bought a Delta/Rockwell 12" radial arm saw for another $50.00. I actually had just bought a craftsman 10" RAS last week on ebay, but, the deal was too good to pass up. The table alone is worth $50 to me.
The problem is, both new saws are 3phase 240v. I was wondering what the consensus here is. Should I build or get a phase converter? Or, should I change the motor out on the bandsaw to single phase and re-sell the RAS? I don't think it would be feasible to replace that motor. Also, would the phase converter work for both devices? Or, are they pretty specific to HP ranges?
Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Eric
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mnterpfan asks:

For myself, I'd change the motor on the bandsaw, pick up a 1-1/2 HP unit at most, and trade off the 12". Well, that's what I should do. But given the features of the Craftsman vs. the features of the 12" Delta, I'd really look for a low cost phase convertor or plans for making one.
Charlie Self "A judge is a law student who marks his own examination papers." H. L. Mencken
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You have to decide which would be cheaper. You can run multiple tools with one rotary phase converter.
I'm on a project now to build my own rotary phase converter. I recently purchased a very nice 1975 Powermatic Model 66 for $250 (gloat) that has a 3 PH, 3 HP motor. I decided I might run other 3 PH equipment and buying/building a converter was about the same price as changing the motor and starter (contactor). It appears there are a several manufacturers of rotary phase converters as well as some that offer kits. I just happened to also find a deal on an available 5 HP 3 PH motor that will serve as my idler motor for the converter.
mnterpfan wrote:

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For the BS, a phase converter should be your last choice. I would think about a VFD like this: http://web3.automationdirect.com/adc/Shopping/Catalog/AC_Drives_-z-_Motors/G S1_(120_-z-_230_VAC_V-z-Hz_Control)/GS1-21P0
For $160 you get 230 single phase in and 230 3 phase out, plus variable speed on a bandsaw would be real spiffy.
For the RAS, well, the HP is so high that a VFD would be cost prohibitive, and variable speed is of no value anyway. So, do you need an RAS?
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (mnterpfan) wrote in message

Additional info: After further research, bandsaw turns out to be 14" metal/wood bandsaw manufactured in June 1956 and the RAS is actually a 14" model manufactured in October 1975. Both are very massive.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (mnterpfan) wrote in message

No one else has thought to say it, so I will. . .you suck ;-)
Dan
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Depending on the horsepower, you might be able to use a variable frequency drive as a phase converter, which would give you variable speed, probably more useful on the bandsaw than the RAS. A VFD will run a motor equal or smaller to its rating. For example:
(Beware of word wrap)
http://web3.automationdirect.com/adc/Shopping/Catalog/AC_Drives_-z-_Motors/GS1_ (120_-z-_230_VAC_V-z-Hz_Control)/GS1-21P0
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (mnterpfan) wrote in message

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Yea, I posted the same link. AC Drives have become so common and less expensive that there really isn't any reason for woodworkers to build phase converters anymore. Unless you just happen to have all the components laying around.
Even for the RAS, a drive like this would work great: http://web1.automationdirect.com/adc/Shopping/Catalog/AC_Drives_-z-_Motors/G S2_(230_-z-_460_VAC_V-z-Hz_Control)/GS2-23P0
There is no reason you cannot just lock it at 60 hz. And it handles up to 3 HP which is usually about the limit for single phase in, 3 phase out. And another and, you won't lose power like you will with a converter.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

S1_(120_-z-_230_VAC_V-z-Hz_Control)/GS1-21P0
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On 8/26/2004 2:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (mnterpfan) wrote

As previously noted: You Suck

Before I would do anything I would chewck the motor(s) to see if they are dual voltage. Just because they are currently (pun intended) set up for 240 doesn't mean that they can't be re wired for 110. On my Delta bandsaw which sounds much the same ass yours, the motor can be hooked up either way with a diagram on a metal plate on the outside of the motor.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Tchswoods) wrote in message >

Thank you. Its an honor.

The RAS is dual voltage. 240/440 not 120/240. I think the bandsaw may be as well, but it is at least 240. Its the phase conversion that I'm trying to get a handle on.
Thanks everybody for your suggestions. I'm really interested in the VFDs that people have mentioned. I'm worried that they will not handle the inclement weather up here in Minnesota that well though. Does anybody have any experience with them in cold temps? I would be okay with them not working in the cold. I just don't want them to be damaged due to cold weather storage.
I will most probably buy a single phase 1 to 1.5 hp motor for the bandsaw. The current motor frame is 66Y. This should be 4 1/8 inches from center of shaft to base if I understand this correctly. Most modern motors seem to be in the 56 range. Can these just be boosted up to work?
As for the RAS, if the VFD would be vulnerable to the cold, I will probably buy or build a rotary phase converter. Apparently, this means I will also need another bigger 3 phase motor for an idler.
Thanks,
Eric
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Most VFDs I have worked with will trip out in very cold weather. To sovles the problem just mount the VFD in a cabinet and put in a small heater. I service a bunch of outdoor equipment with VFDs. They run fine untill around 0F to -10f then they start tripping out on low temp if the heaters are off. If you are putting the VFD in an occasionally heated shop you probably will not have a problem, although I wonder if condensation could be a problem. Still a heated cabinet would cure all. Greg
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