@#$%^&* glasses

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?

Wrong, I've never had that happen. Transitions don't change from the amount of light so that would not affect them at all.
This is how they work: Transitions lenses are photochromic lenses. "Photochromic" means the lenses change from clear to dark in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, such as when exposed to sunlight. Indoors and at night, Transitions lenses are as clear as regular clear lenses. Outdoors, when exposed to the sun's UV rays, they turn sunglass dark, enhancing the quality of vision by reducing glare, thereby minimizing eye strain and fatigue, and improving contrast in all light conditions. And it's all automatic.
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On 1/02/11 1:43 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

find I don't need sunglasses.
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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"FrozenNorth" wrote

You get sun up there in Toronto?<G>
Lew
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On 1/02/11 3:17 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

:-)
--
Froz...


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I wrote:

"FrozenNorth" wrote:

As I often told my mother when I went back to Ohio, "Ma, you have a great summer here in Ohio, both days of it, July 4th and 5th."
And sometimes the 5th was cold.
Lew
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wrote:

You're right, I shouldn't have said "bright enough". Fluors give off some UV, too, or didn't you know? I've watched other people's glasses change under fluors.
Maybe not all brands of lenses are as sensitive as others. But I said "dim", not "fully darken".
-- Not merely an absence of noise, Real Silence begins when a reasonable being withdraws from the noise in order to find peace and order in his inner sanctuary. -- Peter Minard
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wrote:

If the lights over a bench are dimming them then you need to be wearing _something_ because you've got a UV source approximately as bright as sunlight.
They won't dim in a car in broad daylight you know, because the windshield and window glass block enough UV to stop them from working.
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?

About two or three times a year, I wish I could darken them in the car. Most times it is not a bother at all. I really like the fact I don't have to carry a second pair of glasses for sun. I've had transitions for about 12 years now.
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J. Clarke wrote:

I just held the almost new pair up in front of the window here in SW KS w/ bright sun -- storm and inside window, they did darken significantly, even thru the glass. Tinted windshields are more UV filters, of course, but was an interesting spearmint hadn't actually done before...
--
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Any transitionals I have owned (probably about 15 pairs) have always been perfectly clear, with no tinting and it is not detectable.
I would be curious also. We used to have a nutbar, at work, that tooted this stuff years ago but it all turned out to be crap. In the end the safety people recommended the transitionals and paid for them. We had a severe flash hazard in the electrical industry but they decided the lens was better on your face than off due to not being used indoors (they used to issue welding gas glass lenses and nobody would wear them inside)
says... FWIW many safety professionals recommend against transistional lenses in industrial settings where they are not used outdoors.
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Josepi wrote:

My experience has been that's at least nearly enough true when they are new or nearly so. W/ time, every pair I've had has--
a) Gotten where transition isn't nearly as dark b) Transition back to light gets slower c) "Clear" becomes less than perfect d) Become much more temperature sensitive (in that cold weather and hence lenses when outside) so that when return to inside in cold weather may have to remove them to have sufficient light for a while until the lenses can warm and transition.
The last I consider could be at least somewhat of a safety issue; fortunately, not being on a time clock I can't get docked for waiting a while while the lenses clear when go back into the barn from the bright sunlight... :) In a fast-moving industrial setting it could be more serious where an overhead crane or other such could be awaiting...
--
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Yes they can be as dangerous as walking into a dark building from bright reflective and cold snow outside and closing your eyes. When you can't see an keep walking the glasses are not the major safety problem.
Mine fog real bad, as well as staying dark for a few minutes, after blowing the snow outside and I have to take them off to hang up my coat.
I have had one pair that was realligned a few times before they got it right to my eyes that had one glass go completely dead and stay clear permanently. I guess the optometrist went to a different supplier when they adjusted the lens. They were always a slightly different tint of colour anyway. Even my old 20 year ones are still perfectly clear but they take time to "relearn" to change dark and then they work the same as they always did.
I have another pair that always had a yellow tint to the lenses. After complaining to another optometrist about them he took them out of the frames and lo and behold....clear glass.
My experience has been that's at least nearly enough true when they are new or nearly so. W/ time, every pair I've had has--
a) Gotten where transition isn't nearly as dark b) Transition back to light gets slower c) "Clear" becomes less than perfect d) Become much more temperature sensitive (in that cold weather and hence lenses when outside) so that when return to inside in cold weather may have to remove them to have sufficient light for a while until the lenses can warm and transition.
The last I consider could be at least somewhat of a safety issue; fortunately, not being on a time clock I can't get docked for waiting a while while the lenses clear when go back into the barn from the bright sunlight... :) In a fast-moving industrial setting it could be more serious where an overhead crane or other such could be awaiting...
Josepi wrote:

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Are the motorcycle goggles useful for woodworking? I usually use goggles because they fit over my glasses, but have been wondering if prescription goggles or safety glasses would solve the fogging problems.
Puckdropper
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On Dec 31 2010, 1:34am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Mine are WileyX--they're small, not like aviator goggles. And they don't really address fogging that much.

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I just saw a ski goggle that looked interesting, and could work.
It had two layers of lens with space between them, and a tiny fan to blow air though the space and into the face space to keep them from fogging up while outside. They should not fog at all inside, I would think. They are also impact resistant.
--
Jim in NC


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"J. Clarke" wrote:

Sounds like you were lucky.
You could have been wearing them when they broke.
Lew
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If I manage to step on my face, I think breaking my glasses will be the least of my worries.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Get contacts. Wear only one.
One eye will work for distance, the other for close-up (like reading).
I do that and the only disadvantage is that I have to concentrate for near depth-perception .
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I can't wear contacts. Can manage them for a month or so but eventually they get very uncomfortable for me. And that includes one time use disposables so it's not my cleaning.
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You need glasses as a woodworker anyway.
I can't wear contacts. Can manage them for a month or so but eventually they get very uncomfortable for me. And that includes one time use disposables so it's not my cleaning.
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