Glass for a wood rdisplay

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Leon wrote:

I'd go with the 1/8" My glass is 2mm, 3mm or 4mm. I only use 3mm these days, because I was getting tired of the 2mm breaking. I don't even use it for picture framing or shadow boxes any more. There's really not much where you _must_ be under 3mm.
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Score one for the metric system. Maybe the clerk was from Europe where they have too much sense to deal with fractions - not to mention inches and feet.
Mitch
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I'd say metric does make sense for those that are incapable of learning fractions.
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1/8" would have caused the moldings to stand proud of the surrounding surface. These pieces are 5.5" wide and 35" long. 3/32" is plenty thick. 3/32" is what I have always bought in the past and what I had planed for. Fortunately I got what I went for.
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Leon wrote:

Then plane it a little thinner 8-)
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Leon wrote:

Then plane it a little thinner 8-)
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Anyone working in such an industry should have some clue. I've been in the exact situation. I don't bother arguing. I ask for a sheet of single strength glass and get the right thickness.
On a similar note, most shops have no clue how to tell the tin side from the air side of float glass. This is not well known, but important to businesses and artists who paint or print on the glass. A glass business should know this.
Has anyone noticed over the last few years how single strength glass has gotten thinner? Using my micrometer, I find new glass to be several thousandths of an inch thinner. It doesn't sound like much but it is noticeably thinner in handling and has a large effect on strength. -S
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SimonLW (in 4582697e$1 snipped-for-privacy@newsfeed.slurp.net) said:
| On a similar note, most shops have no clue how to tell the tin side | from the air side of float glass. This is not well known, but | important to businesses and artists who paint or print on the | glass. A glass business should know this.
I guess I'm among the clueless. How does one tell; and why is it important?
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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Morris Dovey wrote:

glass enamels are really minerals. some react with tin, giving different colors than are intended. for example, some blues are copper based, and can react with the tin layer to make a fugly brown.
you can detect it with a germicidal uv light in a dark room. the tin side glows. it also beads up water differently, or if you have metal filings, some people can tell by licking the glass.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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said:

Charlie described it well. I use a 4 watt gemicidal light in a battery operated lamp and shine it on a clean sheet in a dark room. The tin side glows with a very pale pink cast. -S
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charlie (in snipped-for-privacy@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com) said:
| Morris Dovey wrote: || SimonLW (in 4582697e$1 snipped-for-privacy@newsfeed.slurp.net) said: || ||| On a similar note, most shops have no clue how to tell the tin ||| side from the air side of float glass. This is not well known, but ||| important to businesses and artists who paint or print on the ||| glass. A glass business should know this. || || I guess I'm among the clueless. How does one tell; and why is it || important? | | glass enamels are really minerals. some react with tin, giving | different colors than are intended. for example, some blues are | copper based, and can react with the tin layer to make a fugly | brown.
Interesting. Usually I'm trying to /not/ paint glass - but this is good information to have filed away. Next time I'm near my local glass shop I'll stop in and ask for a demo.
| you can detect it with a germicidal uv light in a dark room. the tin | side glows. it also beads up water differently, or if you have metal | filings, some people can tell by licking the glass.
Now this info opens up some really interesting possibilities. Does the tin show up brightly; and is it purely a surface deposit (IOW, will it rub/scrub off)?
I think I'd rather go with the UV or water bead tests than lick something without knowing where it's been or who might have licked it before me... :-P
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Morris Dovey wrote:

you're misunderstanding. these are glass paints that are fired onto (and becoming one with) the glass in a range of 1000-1400F. think church stained glass windows with faces fired onto them. latex/oil paint has no affect with the tin layer.
typical window glass shops, i would expect, would not know of this. a decorative glass store (stained, fused, structural, etc) would.

float glass is made by floating molten glass onto a bed of molten tin in an oxygen-free atmosphere. the tin layer has to be blasted off to remove it. btw: there is tin layer in old fashioned plate glass, but hardly anyone makes that anymore.
it's not that bright, but can be seen pretty clearly in the dark. germicidal uv lights are not common, nor are they generally healthy to have around and be looking into a lot. they typically come with a lot of warnings and a purple glass shield which has to be removed to get the correct uv light out of them to show the glowing.

the beading is very subtly different. you can also wash it before licking....

regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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charlie wrote: <snip>

that should read: there is NO tin layer...

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charlie (in snipped-for-privacy@n67g2000cwd.googlegroups.com) said:
| Morris Dovey wrote: || charlie (in snipped-for-privacy@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com) || said: || ||| Morris Dovey wrote: |||| SimonLW (in 4582697e$1 snipped-for-privacy@newsfeed.slurp.net) said: |||| ||||| On a similar note, most shops have no clue how to tell the tin ||||| side from the air side of float glass. This is not well known, ||||| but important to businesses and artists who paint or print on ||||| the glass. A glass business should know this. |||| |||| I guess I'm among the clueless. How does one tell; and why is it |||| important? ||| ||| glass enamels are really minerals. some react with tin, giving ||| different colors than are intended. for example, some blues are ||| copper based, and can react with the tin layer to make a fugly ||| brown. || || Interesting. Usually I'm trying to /not/ paint glass - but this is || good information to have filed away. Next time I'm near my local || glass shop I'll stop in and ask for a demo. | | you're misunderstanding. these are glass paints that are fired onto | (and becoming one with) the glass in a range of 1000-1400F. think | church stained glass windows with faces fired onto them. latex/oil | paint has no affect with the tin layer.
Aha! Ok - now I understand a bit better. Thanks.
| typical window glass shops, i would expect, would not know of this. | a decorative glass store (stained, fused, structural, etc) would.
Gotcha. The shop I visit when I'm buying glass might - they do a fair volume of special order business and seem fairly savvy. They're also patient when I walk in and ask a lot of ignoramus-type questions. I have the distinct impression that they /like/ glass. I like its utility; but they seem to like the stuff itself.
||| you can detect it with a germicidal uv light in a dark room. the ||| tin side glows. it also beads up water differently, or if you ||| have metal filings, some people can tell by licking the glass. || || Now this info opens up some really interesting possibilities. Does || the tin show up brightly; and is it purely a surface deposit (IOW, || will it rub/scrub off)? | | float glass is made by floating molten glass onto a bed of molten | tin in an oxygen-free atmosphere. the tin layer has to be blasted | off to remove it. btw: there is tin layer in old fashioned plate | glass, but hardly anyone makes that anymore. | | it's not that bright, but can be seen pretty clearly in the dark. | germicidal uv lights are not common, nor are they generally healthy | to have around and be looking into a lot. they typically come with | a lot of warnings and a purple glass shield which has to be removed | to get the correct uv light out of them to show the glowing.
Understood. I've seen these things; and have some friends that use them (or something very like) for special effect signage with shields so that the tubes can't be seen directly.
|| I think I'd rather go with the UV or water bead tests than lick || something without knowing where it's been or who might have licked || it before me... :-P | | the beading is very subtly different. you can also wash it before | licking....
Yup. Still...
Thank you, Charley (and Simon). Like a lot of other people, I've been fascinated with what can be done with light and glass and color. It has a way of catching and holding the eye much the same way as does fireworks - except that it's much more lasting.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Morris Dovey wrote:

glass enamels are really minerals. some react with tin, giving different colors than are intended. for example, some blues are copper based, and can react with the tin layer to make a fugly brown.
you can detect it with a germicidal uv light in a dark room. the tin side glows. it also beads up water differently, or if you have metal filings, some people can tell by licking the glass.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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Morris Dovey wrote:

glass enamels are really minerals. some react with tin, giving different colors than are intended. for example, some blues are copper based, and can react with the tin layer to make a fugly brown.
you can detect it with a germicidal uv light in a dark room. the tin side glows. it also beads up water differently, or if you have metal filings, some people can tell by licking the glass.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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Morris Dovey wrote:

glass enamels are really minerals. some react with tin, giving different colors than are intended. for example, some blues are copper based, and can react with the tin layer to make a fugly brown.
you can detect it with a germicidal uv light in a dark room. the tin side glows. it also beads up water differently, or if you have metal filings, some people can tell by licking the glass.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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Morris Dovey wrote:

glass enamels are really minerals. some react with tin, giving different colors than are intended. for example, some blues are copper based, and can react with the tin layer to make a fugly brown.
you can detect it with a germicidal uv light in a dark room. the tin side glows. it also beads up water differently, or if you have metal filings, some people can tell by licking the glass.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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Morris Dovey wrote:

glass enamels are really minerals. some react with tin, giving different colors than are intended. for example, some blues are copper based, and can react with the tin layer to make a fugly brown.
you can detect it with a germicidal uv light in a dark room. the tin side glows. it also beads up water differently, or if you have metal filings, some people can tell by licking the glass.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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Ok to day I had to go back to the glass company. I found that my clear piece of glass was too large, I cut it to fit thinking that I mismeasured. Then the Mirror was too small. You guessed it. She got the clear mixed with the mirror measurements.

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