Getting machine up onto movable base -- how?

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This is probably a dumb question, but...
I've got a 6" jointer, which weighs about 200 lbs. I just got a mobile base for it, and now that I've got the base assembled, I'm stumped on how I'm supposed to get it onto the base.
I suppose I could just get a friend and we pick up each end of the machine, but I'm afraid that picking it up by the table ends will damage the ways or at least knock things out of alignment (if not the table alignment, then maybe my vertibrae alignment). Is there a simple way to do this that's not going to mess up the machine or my back?
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I recently put a 350lb band saw on to a mobile base, tip the tool over and put 2x4's, stacked if necessary under one side tall enough to push the base under + the thickness of a 1x4. Then push up the other side and slide the base under with 1x4's on top of the base. The 1x4's allow the machine to slide on top of the base until it is correctly centered. Remove the 1x4's and let the machine drop down. Obviously easier with 2 people.
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Neat idea. Seems that an improvement may be to substitute steel pipe for the 1x material. Makes it easier to reposition.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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wrote:

Steel pipe probably would make positioning a bit easier however you only have to push the equipment around a couple of inches. Pipe however may be easier to remove after positioning the machine.
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On Tue, 06 Jun 2006 14:20:17 GMT, "Leon"

Exactly how I did it with my Unisaw...by myself.
But, I had another MRI last week. Got another disk bulging...looks like more steroid injections. [g]
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The Europeans have had this all figured out for some time now. Include or offer a mobility kit that your 10 year old could use. Powermatic has the mobility base built in on the new 2000 TS. My 500 lb Laguna that replaced the 350 lb Rikon has 2 holes drilled into the base. You slip a steel shaft through the holes in the base a mount a wheel on each end where the shaft protrudes out and then add a washer and a retainer clip. You have to tip the saw when slipping the wheels on the shaft. For the other end you use a Johnson bar with wheels to lift the saw and steer it when you move it.

Injections in your back? ;~( I had a steroid injection in the butt about 5 years ago to treat Bells Palsy. It did no good for recovery from the Palsy but 2 days later my elbow and toe stopped hurting. I used to play a lot of golf in school and screwed up my right elbow. For about 10 years my elbow bothered me until I got that injection. Still pain free. The toe started hurting again after dropping the Rikon BS table top on it 4 months ago. It is much better now. :~)
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On 6 Jun 2006 10:03:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Roy Smith) wrote:

If you can get a twobyfor under one end, you're home free... anything thinner may break..
insert "lever" under edge of machine, lift the other end of lever a bit and put a block of scrap under it... Ideally, have someone step on the end of the lever so you can put something under the end... repeat on other end..
NOTE: assuming an open middle frame on the base, this will work if your supports under the machine (that you put in while it was lifted) are a bit higher than the mobile base.. YMWV Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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No such a dumb question. If you do not have a chain hoist or a come-a-long or other mechanical method of lifting the machine, get help. Why risk injury or serious damage to your new machine? My attitude is, work smart - not hard.
Dave
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I can certainly rig up a block and tackle from a floor joist above, but I'm not sure where to lift it from. There's no obvious place to attach a hoist to it. This is a closed-stand Jet 6" jointer.
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Roy Smith wrote:

I don't trust the joists enough to use a block and tackle. It's one thing to support a roof; it's a whole 'nother thing to support a heavy jointer by one point.
When I put my 8" North State jointer together (with a buddy), we assembled the movable base first thing, then placed the jointer base on it. We then lifted the guts of the jointer onto its base. By doing it in stages like that, it was actually much easier than I was expecting. Neither of us had to struggle. I am usually inclined to do these projects alone but this was one beast I was afraid to tackle. Assembled, it ran over 500 lbs.
Now, if I were in your shoes and didn't want to take the top off the jointer to make it more managable, I'd tip it over and balance it on one side so that the lower wing doesn't take all the weight, then have my buddy slide the base under it as best he can. Rocking it back and forth a couple of times ought to do the job. I really doubt you'll move either of the tables out off adjustment.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE
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Floor Joists don't hold up roofs they hold up floors. ;~) If the joists are indeed floor joists and not ceiling joists they would probably be strong enough to handle 350 lbs. I would not trust ceiling joists. I am guessing that he is in a cellar or the first floor of a multi floor building.
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wrote:

Get two lifting straps -one under each outfeed table. Join at one point. You will have to check the tables after lifting but they should be fine. BTW, jointers on movable bases need to be checked more often anyway. They flex and get banged around more than a fixed based machine.
Dave
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Good advice -- if he's got one of them newfangled bidirectional jointers! <g>

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snip Teamcasa

Alex
LOL - I should have said - One under each table!
Dave
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Ok, you got me thinking on that one Dave... How about sticking a truck inner tube or some kind of bladder under one end at a time and filling the sucker? Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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snip
Dave
I don't know Mac, I would think it would be difficult to control by yourself. Imagine - hold machine - fill inner tube - balance - all the air moves to one side quickly - oops!
I have a 500# Honda generator I load in and out of my truck with a chain hoist anchored from my (oversized) garage door header. Believe me when I say, let machines do the heavy lifting!
Dave
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I was thinking of putting the bladder or whatever under one end at a time...
What I'd REALLY do is use my $5 harbor fright furniture mover... little bar and plate on wheels that you stick under one end and step on.. lifts about 3 inches so you can put the cute lil wheels under things... I've moved my lathe with it a few times... and I can't even slide that sucker on the floor by myself.. *g*
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber@810
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Tip it up and use TWO 12" pipes to roll it into position. An extra pair of hands is almost essential.
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Roy Smith wrote:

Can you and a friend just pick it up by the existing base? That way you won't risk misalignment of the beds.
Chris
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I got a 6" jointer and asked a friend to help out. He couldn't come right away and I couldn't wait so I thought I'd give it a go on my own. It took almost no time to get it up on the base and I was none the worse for wear.
I think the shipping weight of my jointer was in the neighbourhood of 250lbs. But the motor is in the base and I hadn't attached the fence assembly yet. So I think the bed (all of the heavy lifting) must have been considerably less than that. For me the hardest part was getting the plastic bag off it without it sliding off the base before I could bolt it. (I didn't want anti-rust grease all over my clothes--and remember to slip the drive belt on before you bolt it! (DAMHIKT)) No alignment problems that I could make out, either.
I'm not necessarily recommending you do what I did, but I think most people are bigger and stronger than I am, so you might just try hefting it a bit and use your own best judgement.
- Owen -
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