Gel Stain and Final Finish(?) for Rustic Bed - Ideas Needed

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On 9/13/16, Leon wrote:

Here are a couple of rustic projects I made from old pallets. <
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/68/79/17/687917214d756f77245f5ed4673d53d3.jpg
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https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/c4/db/0c/c4db0c4c1b31e9123966c72e958db2fa.jpg

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On 9/13/2016 3:39 PM, SWMBO wrote:

I really like the second project. Do you have the plans?
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On 9/13/2016 4:03 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Sorry, it was a one off. I made this out of an old coffee table. <https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/51d89e/i_made_this_out_of_an_old_coffee_table
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On 9/13/2016 5:18 PM, SWMBO wrote:

Nice work. It sure showcases your skills and ability to get the most out of tools. Oh, I don't want to neglect your design ability too.
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On Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 12:04:27 PM UTC-4, SWMBO wrote:

I think I am far more amenable to the discreet use of a split board in a rustic creation than all the unending (and less than humorous) sexual innuendo being spewed in the video...really???
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I've been thinking about this. If it were me - and I know many would not agree - I'd just use oil. Reasons follow.
1. Your wood has been aging for 20 years and you haven't sanded it. Any clear top coat will exacerbate whatever roughness there is. I once saw a stair hand rail in an owner built log house that was so rough that he might as well have embedded shards of glass. I'm sure yours isn't that rough but is it rough enough after varnishing to snag sheets or blankets?
2. Oil is extremely easy to use and is close to fool proof. It IS fool proof as long as the surface is well wiped after applying.
3. IMO, oil is entirely satisfactory for your project. I sleep in a bed I made 30 years ago that was finished with oil. All drawers - there are many - had the insides finished with oil; if the drawer fronts don't show, they too were oiled; if exposed, lacquered just for show, not utility.
If you want to consider oil, you have two choices: linseed or tung. Both will enhance the grain and color the wood. Over time, the tung changes very little; linseed darkens, how much depends upon how much was soaked up by the wood; if considerable - yours would - the darkening will also be accompanied by a shift toward red. Two to three coats of either would be sufficient. I thin either 50/50 with paint thinner, sometime more dilute (25/75) with tung..
A variation on just oil would be one that includes a bit of varnish like Watco. Works like oil but doesn't build a surface layer (unless a LOT of coats are used).
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On Wednesday, September 14, 2016 at 9:54:29 AM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

Thanks for the suggestion. I'll do some research on this.
I hope others will (politely) voice their opinion on this matter. The shift towards red with linseed oil might be desirable although the use of the words "over time" might be considered less than precise. ;-)
Are we talking months, years or decades?
A trip down memory lane...
I once worked for an IT director at a Fortune 500 company. Phrases like "Oh, it won't take very long" or "It will cost a lot of money" would result in a lecture - one time. The next time a project manager used a phrase like that typically meant that the odds were very good that they wouldn't be managing any more projects for her. In general, she was not a fun person to work for. ;-)
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On 09/14/2016 10:02 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

Yes... :)
I've used the Minwax Antique Oil (a linseed-based rubbing oil) for years...it's not terribly unique as oil finishes go but is easy to apply, has a yellowing cast typical of linseed oil but can be applied over oil-based stains if desired. I've pieces that have been finished with it for going on 40 yr now that haven't darkened that much that I can at least recognize. The nice thing of an oil finish is that it can be renewed trivially; the bad thing is they aren't terribly robust to spills and such but one wouldn't expect that to be much of an issue for a bed frame. It's basically my "go to"; don't think can go wrong.
Again, you'll want to test it on a piece...
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Never timed it but best guess is months; not 2-3, more like 10-12
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On 09/14/2016 12:43 PM, dadiOH wrote: ...

Like most other effects, how much direct sunlight (read UV) the object receives will have a major effect on rate/amount of darkening. And, of course, the wood species itself--cherry has its well-known darkening; fir is relatively stable as it doesn't have a tremendous amount of color altho will darken.
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