Garbage for sale at Home Depot

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I stopped at HD over lunch today, and on my way out I see this kitchen cabinet with no counter top. It's made of cheap melamine, and in the top four corners were four thin little plastic triangles, STAPLED in place. I guess they were there for strength.
Who conceives of these things?!
- Owen -
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Owen,
I can't answer your question but I would guess that the accountants and the MBA's of the company are the driving force. They won't stock something for very long if they can't sell so many of them over a certain time period. I'm sure they have some very specific stocking models that take into account numerous factors to determine if an item is stocked or not.
Bottom line, if it doesn't sell well - they don't stock it. That means those cheap cabinets you saw do sell. What that means is if you're looking for quality, look someplace else cause that doesn't sell very well at the borg's. Most contractors and DIY fixer-upper's want pricepoint - and could care less about the quality.
The plastic triangles are used to help keep the sides from racking and are used to secure the top to the base. A short screw thru the plastic to the top and it keeps it from sliding around and falling off the edge of the earth...
Bob S.

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snipped-for-privacy@eliminator.com says...

--
Those flimsy plastic triangles haven't done a very good job of securing
the top to the base at my house. The plastic allowed enough play that
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Well....see...they did work. The top only moves around a little bit.......;-)
Just place some silicon sealant along the top edge (between the underside of the top and the base) and press it down. After it setup - it won't move. Should you want to remove the top, slide a putty knife in and slide it along to cut the sealant.
Bob S.
says...

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Your landlord buys these cabinets. He ordered one of those "get rich quick by becoming a slum lord" programs on cable tv and is buying low and renting high. Just kidding.....or at least I hope it's not your landlord. Robert
Owen Lawrence wrote:

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Most here on the wreck are spoiled - we expect good to excellent construction in general.
I bought a vanity/sink combo at HD a few months ago for a condo renovation. It was $99 for both items in a single box.
I would never buy this for myself, but the market is the market. It will last 10+ years. What more could you want?
There is a place/price for most anything that's for sale out there.
Me? I like to build my stuff out of real wood and use the best stuff I can find.
I would bet that it's hard making a living doing that.
(I'm a retired hobbyist).
Lou
Like someone said here a while back: "good, fast, cheap - pick any two"
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Since I expect to last more than 10 years, I want my stuff to last more than 10 years. In fact, I want my stuff to last at least as long as my children last. That's what I want. What do I expect? I'm learning. I now expect everything I own to be garbage in ten years, except for the comptuers, which seem to manage that feat in two. That means that whatever thing I plan to have in my life, I need to amortize its cost over ten years, and expect to pay that amount for the rest of my life, indexed for inflation or whatever. It puts a sobering damper on dreams like the fully equipped workshop, for example.
We're shopping for windows right now. We hope to move somewhere else in maybe 8 or 9 years, but if I buy cheap now, they'll be showing their age when I want to sell. Buying good will cost three times as much, but I'm inclined to do so anyway. We might not be able to move; who knows. And as I look around the house I see that I really want to renovate the TV room, a bathroom or two, and the kitchen. But the joists under the kitchen seem barely able to hold the weight of the fridge. To do a proper job means rebuilding the entire house. It's overwhelming. For Get It.
It's really disappointing to see how you risk getting poorly made stuff at every turn. I was actually in the store to buy a solid brass quick disconnect for my garden hose. The other plastic ones I bought a few years ago still work fine, but I'm not expecting them to last. When they fail, they'll turn to brass, too. I felt very good about my purchase.
"If you can't afford to buy it once, you certainly can't afford to buy it twice."
Anybody want to buy about a thousand books, several old computers, a SLR camera and lenses, some synthesizers, and a mountain of kids' toys? $225k, pre-packaged in a house. All (ahem) good. :)
- Owen -
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Owen Lawrence wrote:

Actually, many thousands of people can stretch to buy the cheap item once, but can never come close to three times the price (or more) for the top quality item. In a decade, they can probably afford another, by continuing to stretch.
And an astonishing number of people remodel kitchens, including cabinets, well inside the 10 year mark. One of my maternal aunts used to insist on new appliances every five years, which sometimes made my mother remark that she wished we were closer than 1500 miles, as the old ones were always just fine.
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Tell me about it. A while ago, I bought a co-op apartment. The building had been completely renovated, and all the appliances (fridge, stove, dishwasher, microwave, washer/dryer) were brand new. Nothing was top of the line, but it wasn't junk either. 11 years later, we sold the place. Everything was in working order, but showed 11 years of cosmetic wear and tear.
After we accepted their offer, the buyer got an engineering inspection (not an unreasonable thing to do, but the idea is to find hidden or unexpected flaws). About all the inspector could find to complain about was that the appliances were 11 years old and "nearing the end of their useful lifetime". The buyer insisted on a reduction in price so they could buy all new appliances.
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My grandmother had a saying which I have lived by all my adult life:
"I'm too poor to buy cheap stuff."
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Hi, Owen.
While I don't need the house, computers, or synthesizers, the SLR and lenses might be appealing - if you were serious.
If so, send me an e-mail:
squanklin at yahoo
Thanks! Frank
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[...]

So instead of following your hobby you just sit and enjoy the result? ;-)
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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loutent says...

Would they stand up to a water mishap like leaky seals or a minor flood? If not, then they are a poor purchase. You installed it yourself I take it? What about cost of installation, if the little old lady who buys it has to replace it? What about the headaches of loss of use, clean-up or whatever when it does fail? Bedsides, this is America. We can afford to buy better things once in a while. A good quality vanity/sink wouldn't put a dent in the beer or spoil-the-grandkids budget.
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Owen Lawrence wrote:

cost/benefit study including the need for longevity, reliability, and appearance. If it works for you, buy cheap.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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Hey, you saw a 'deluxe' model compared to some crap out there. I mean not even melamine...paper pressed on particle board, without finished edges on doors..and pieces of cardboard hot-melt glued in the corners for 'strength'. I have had to decline a few sales of my solid surface countertops because there wasn't enough 'cabinet' to support it.... particularly in the corner 'cabinets' made from a piece of cardboard tubing which looks like Sonotube, but is a lot weaker than the real tubing.
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Here's a quick, down and dirty fix. Don't go to Home Depot. If you are held at gunpoint and forced in, avert your eyes.
Just remember, no one is forcing anyone to buy these terrible products. They buy it out of ignorance or laziness.
Or maybe it is all they can afford. Or maybe it suits their purpose.
I think they should sell a Krenov style cabinet and then the enlightened ones can buy those. I am sure that they could sell enough to keep HD et. al. in business, aren't you? Then the great unwashed/unsuspecting/enenlightned can go suck eggs looking for their purpose built affordable cabinets.
BTW, you should try pulling one of those plastic corners apart, when it has been installed properly.
Robert
Robert
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So here's the deal folks. At the big name places like Home Depot, Lowes, Wal-Mart, K-Mart & whatever-Mart, you can buy really inexpensive items (including, but not limited to kitchen cabinets). Who buys this stuff? Guys like my father-in-law. He loves telling us about how he worked two jobs when he was in his twenties--a day job working construction, and a night job at the local steel mill. He brags about how he used to go to the mill and sleep most of the time. The mill's closed now, of course, but "It's the dammed Japanese" who took his job. He has voted the straight Democratic ticket his whole life, and is an adamant Union supporter (and life-long Union member). But he also revels in telling us what great bargains he gets on stuff at Wal-Mart.
So that's the kind of people who buy this stuff....people who have absolutely no contact with reality, and buy only on price....

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WOW!!!
So the only folks that shop at big volume low price places are lazy ass slackers that belong to unions and vote the democratic ticket? You aren't related to Howard Dean are you? Talk about out of touch with reality...
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I never knew that one has to be a lazy-ass union member to vote democrat. So half of all Americans are lazy-ass unionized democrats?
I'm glad you have cleared that up for me, Robert.
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On Fri, 01 Jul 2005 12:44:51 -0400, the opaque Robatoy

Yeah, and the other half are lazy-assed non-union repugnicans.
There are a few of us smart-assed, anti-union, small-gov't, anti-war, pro-freedom, clear-headed libertarians around, too.
P.S: Good post, Robert!
- This product cruelly tested on defenseless furry animals - -------------------------------------------------------- http://diversify.com Web App & Database Programming
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