Garage works, Brian on LJ

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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 19:10:07 -0600, Dave Balderstone

I still have the scars, 47 years later, from attempting to use a dull jacknife to cut some willow twigs. Not sharp enough to cut the twigs easily, but sharp enough to cut meat!!!!
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 19:10:07 -0600, Dave Balderstone

In addition to that, there's a particular sense of satisfaction one gets from using a sharp tool that you just can't get from struggling with one that is dull.
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*snip*

*snip*
Send me one, I'll sharpen it and send it back to you. Then, you can decide whether or not it's worth the effort to sharpen the rest.
I've had trouble with 1/4" chisels on the Work Sharp, so better make it 1/2" or larger.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Mike,

Thanks Mike. You are correct, I am not against sharp tools. I just don't use chisels enough to worry about sharpening them. I'm lucky if I even use a chisel once a year, and even then I tend to be rather hard on them (more for construction tasks than fine woodworking).
I would love to do more hand tool work, but most of the projects I do are fairly basic and completed with power tools.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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You should do like I do.
You owe it to yourself a to go out and get a low to mid priced new set of chisels. Like some metal ended Stanley's. Put them where they will not get used for rough construction. A small amount of discipline means you go back to the toolbox and get your old beater chisels out when you want to get rough with a chisel. Then take your old beater chisels and with a cup of water or oil to frequently dip and keep them cool, hit them up on the bench grinder of stationary sanding disk, and get them back to a good profile, and roughly sharp. Sure, they are not like they would be with a wet stone, but who cares. They are for rough work, and not perfect, but at least they can be close to sharp.
Then you have the best of both worlds, even if you are not in the hand tool world all that often, you with be able to do it the best you can, and safely, as a bonus.
--
Jim in NC


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I haven't read anyone say you are against sharp tools. You choose not to sharpen.
That sharp tools are safer and produce better work is not a matter of belief or opinion.
It is simple fact.
djb
--
³Youth ages, immaturity is outgrown, ignorance can be educated, and drunkenness
sobered, but stupid lasts forever.² -- Aristophanes
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

I remembered that lesson a few seconds after I jammed by hand into the corner of my workbench a year or two ago. I counted myself lucky!

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Dave,

It's not that I "choose" not to sharpen, I just haven't had the need or the knowledge/tools to sharpen them.
The set of chisels I have now are probably 5-6 years old and I've probably only used them briefly four or five times. I used them last week to square up routed rabbet corners in a picture frame, probably the biggest task I've ever used them for. They're still about as sharp as the day I bought them. They seem to cut well when I have needed them.
I have an older set of chisels that I use more for construction work. I've hit nails and everything else with them. They take a beating, but I never use them for fine detail work.
I keep meaning to pick up a sharpening stone or something and learn how to sharpen my chisels. It just isn't something that has been a big priority since I rarely use them. In the past, I've just bought a new set of chisels when the old set got dull. :)
In any case, my original post was meant to support Brian at GarageWoodworks, not delve into my personal sharpening habits. :)
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 3/31/2014 1:06 PM, HerHusband wrote:

So I looked at your website. Nice work you have done...
Not sure how you work without ever really needing a chisel.
I find I use a chisel quite often.
As far as Brian goes, and I appreciate that you support him, but that technique of rocking the chisel back and forth is really ugly. The fibers were ripped like crazy. For me, that would not have been the way I would have cut it. I use the tool to cut, chop.. Prying is left to mortising. Twisting.... never.. it's not what the tool was designed for, nor how it should be used. The result may have been ok, for him and others, but for me, it was UGLY.
And the problem is that Brian is teaching people with these videos.. And that's my problem.... teaching them right and there are more than one right way... is fine.. teaching them that.. well, no..
--
Jeff

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"HerHusband" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------- Get a piece of plate glass and some sandpaper and you're in business with scarysharp approach.
Lew
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