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<http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00183.asp

SNIP
SNIP
Two comments:
Hmmmm. I didn't know the term "almost indefinitely" means "every few months"... ; )
In the Pac. NW, if you leave the plywood covering on cast iron during the winter months, you'll be very sorry. The plywood will absorb a lot of moisture from the rain-soaked air, leading to rust on the tool surface.
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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No doubt about it. Elevating your plywood on some sort of non-hygroscopic material will keep the rust at bay, however. Plastic strips work well.
I keep a plywood cover on my tablesaw because it's in line with the throw zone of my lathe when I'm roughing bowls. Notice after five minutes of turning and rub out for ten....
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wrote:

SNIP
Thought I oughta add what I do DO for the winter months: I saturate a few sheets of newspaper or packing paper with WD-40 and put that on the cast iron. If I don't plan on using a tool for an extended time I'll saturate the paper with cheap motor oil. Works well but the WD-40 is easier to remove with a quick rubdown of kerosene or spirits while the oil takes a little more time and materials to clean.
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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