Freud vs CMT lock-miter bits


Anyone have any experience with these two bits? Saw the Freud demo at the Milwaukee woodworking show. It comes with a setup block and retails for about $80, ($50 less than CMT.) I can't imagine that the Freud would not be of acme quality. With that said, whats the word on the $40 woodline bits?
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BD wrote:

You might want to consider these as well...
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p0119&cat=1,46168
Chris
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Thanks, I just checked out the leevalley link you sent me. Unfortunately I need one with 1" or > depth of cut.
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Have you tried the MLCS website ??
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com /
They have a bit that can be used on wood from 1/2" up to 1-1/8"
John
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Hey thanks! It looks like thats the one I'm going with. I have some reservations about running it in quarter sawn white oak with my Porter Cable 690RVS 3/4 HP. I think it should do ok as long as I pre-miter the board edges. Any thoughts?
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I can't imagine that the

I could. I probably have 10-14 Freud bits and am not impressed with their quality. I would choose CMT over Freud every time assuming they offer the same profile. They both come from Italy so I am not being prejudice. ;~)
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Leon wrote:

Me too.
I'v e used carbide router bits sold by Sears, Master Mechanic, Viper, Eagle America, and Freud. The only crappy ones were the Freuds.
They were nice and sharp and well-balanced but the carbide rapidly developed crumbly edges. They didn't just get dull like other bits, they had (comparatively) huge chunks of carbide missing from the edges.
--

FF


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Exactly my experience. I still keep a few chunks of the carbide as a reminder.
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Leon wrote:

Last time I complained about this on the wreck I was told that sort of failure was characteristic of poorly recycled carbide. Evidently recycled carbide is is ground up and then mixed with fresh material all of which is then sintered together. Big chunks tear out if the recycled carbide is not ground finely enough and does not bond well to the matrix.
--

FF


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I will definitely side with the people steering you towards CMT. If you have any CMT bits, look at them under a magnifying glass. Look closely at the carbide tips. Then look at virtually any other brand on the market. The micro grain carbide they use comes to a chrome like polished finish, it much less resistant to chipping off and keeps its sharp longer than any other bits I have every used. When you look at the carbide tips on the other brands, even the ones that come close, there is always a noticable difference in the appearance, you can always detect the larger grains, which means dulling quicker and easier to have pieces chip off.
You get what you pay for, CMT often times cost twice as much. However, they usually last at least 4 times longer........oh yeah, then there's that whole issue of how much cleaner they cut.
CMT bits, IMHO are worth the price, finest bits on the market. The only time I use something different, like one of the other responders here, is when I cannot find a profile I need in a CMT bit.

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Well thanks for all the responses. I was looking around the internet and found an article from Fine Woodworking ( www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00045.asp ). Surprisingly, the MLCS beat the CMT although both were in the top 7 of 17. At a third of the price I think I am going with the MLCS-it also comes with a setup block.
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That was with just a straight bit. I would like to see the same test with a profile bit.
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Leon is right BD,
You're comparing apples to oranges here. Getting a higher rating on one bit one time from one magazine is not a sound arguement.
If you find yourself always adjusting this, and adjusting that, and speeding up bit speed, slowing down feed rate, vice versa, changing cutting depth, taking more passes....................etc etc etc..........and you keep getting tearout and imperfect joints or you find yourself wishing you could get consistent perfect/clean cuts etc..................
Try a CMT bit. You'll see.
RRRangerPaul

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Well thanks for your concern. I have already ordered the MLCS bit. I'm using it to make four quarter sawn white oak quadralinear bed posts. Hopefully it will live that long. I would hate to buy redundant bits but Woodcraft is having a 25% off CMT bits this month so if it comes to it I'll go get one of those.
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Ranger Paul wrote:

As in "red" to "orange"? <G>
Barry
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Ranger Paul wrote:

Add one more!
CMT is excellent. However, CMT is #2 to Whiteside in my experience.
Barry
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