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"MSCHAEF.COM" wrote in message

You left out "compatible and interchangeable" to describe the hardware, and a ubiquitous OS, love it or hate it, without which none of it would have happened when it did.
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Those things pre-date Microsoft. The Apple ][ is probably the first mainstream example in the PC field. IBM System/360 is probably the first example in computing, in general.
Microsoft, however, has been the best advocate of this strategy and by far the biggest beneficiary.
-Mike
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"MSCHAEF.COM" wrote in message

is
spend
and
Actually, I had a valid, and authorized, senior moment when I was trying to remember the terminology for the real impetus, IMO, in the advent of the personal computer a la "cheaper hardware": "non-proprietary" hardware. Something Apple has certainly never been guilty of, and certainly not IBM in the 360 series, which was not "personal computing" by any yardstick.
But, I may well have wrongly assumed that the discussion was about the PC and its hardware/software/OS.
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Excuse please, but who wrote Applesoft?
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...

Microsoft. I said as much in another post.
That said, they didn't have anything to do with the price or availabiliy of the hardware. I also doubt that the marginal difference between Integer BASIC and Applesoft was what made or broke the Apple ][.
Going back, Microsoft was founded in reaction to the avaibility of cheap hardware (in the form of the Altair 8800).
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Yeah, I saw that after I read this. Not sure of posting order, not that it matters.

I used to have an Altair 680, but a... let's say person I know... left it IN A LEAKY GARAGE and it got wrecked. Ask me how I feel about that. No really, go ahead.
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...

Argh..... that's awful.
-Mike
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Still haven't forgiven the bastard, obviously. Some things just can't be fixed, y'know?
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Truth be known, none of this OT/BS matters.
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Yup.
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The fact that a company named Ecosoft managed to put a fullblown K&R C compiler on a 64K CP/M machine still boggles my mind. Everyone else was offering subsets. I could develop software for a big machine on my little S100 bus system.
And yes, they even had software floating point.
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Ahhhhh the good old days... The Displaywriter took over from the "Mag Card Composer", which was a IBM Selectric with mag storage and other fancy features... It went for well over 10K as I recall.
Swingman wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

There were a whole series of other standalone systems between there as well that were processor-based. They went in the $20k range or thereabouts depending on printer options, etc.
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On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 10:29:20 -0600, Duane Bozarth

There were entire companies dedicated to the business, like Wang.
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I htink I'd say my first word processor was a KayPro in '82, and it cost something like $2800...but didn't have a thing on it supplied by MS, that I am able to recall. OS was cp/m.
A place I worked in the late '60s had IBM word processors: what a gas compared to our current machinery. Card punches and all.
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It may be correct, but did the author have a better OS? I love it when programmers complain about MS but have never taken the time to make a better OS or program.
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Well, there was CP/M and DR-DOS.
Windows was layered on top of DS, and many people wanted to replace DOS with DR-DOS because of it's advanced features.
But Microsoft illegally put hooks in their OS to detect Dr-DOS and refuse to work if found. So the company went bankrupt. And when Microsoft started making 90% profit, and abusing their monopolistic power (they WERE convicted, remember), it was hard for any competitor to catch up.
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On 15 Feb 2005 02:30:42 GMT, Bruce Barnett
Have you use Concurrent DOS, Multitasking and Multiuser DOS also by DR-DOS in the eighties?

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You're not under the mistaken impression that Microsoft wrote the original DOS (PC-DOS, MS-DOS), are you? Hell, Gates _sold_ it to IBM, and *then* went out and bought the rights from a company that "didn't know what they had". (Yup, that's the chronology, he sold IBM something that he did _not_ own the rights to; admittedly, he did "have reason to believe" he _could_ buy those rights for a relative pittance. M$ has _always_ been 'marketing driven', not a 'technology' company. And it _shows_ in their product line.)
Several better ones exist (now, _and_ then). OS/9, and QNX, just to name a couple. Heck, MP/M 86 had features _years_ before M$ "invented" them.
The _only_ reason that MS "succeeded" was that Gates sold a product (that he didn't *at*that*time* have the rights to) to IBM. And IBM's entry into the 'personal computer' market "legitimized" it in the eyes of business purchasers. The "nobody ever got fired for buying IBM" mentality at work.
Alpha-Micro had better hardware, *and* better software. So did Tandy(!!) Who's machines (like the 'Tandy 2000') were *far* superior to IBM's competing offerings (and which they got to market _before_ the IBM products) -- industry joke was that the "AT" in the "IBM PC/AT" stood for "Another Tandy". Unfortunately, while Tandy's "x86" machines were 'MS-DOS' compatible, the Tandy machines were not 'hardware compatible' "clones". Software that 'played on the bare hardware' (rather than using the O/S services, or even BIOS calls), didn't work on the Tandy machines.
Software writers did that _because_ the O/S services (provided by Microsoft), and the BIOS code (as done by IBM) were *SO*BAD* that circumventing them was -necessary- to get decent performance from the hardware. Tandy used _better_, more capable, hardware in their 'business'-class machines, and with "better" BIOS code, got _very_acceptable_ performance through those 'portable' interfaces, w/o programmers having to play on the bare hardware.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

There was also a PC VMS "work-alike"...multi-user/multi-tasking...
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