Framing Nailers for Roofing

I'm going to be helping out on a fair sized roofing job, and I'd really rather use a nailer than doing it "the old way".
Does anyone make a coil framing nailer than also shoots roofing nails? Or am I just asking for trouble?
TIA, tms
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There are coil framing nailers and there are roofing nailers. Most roofing nailers are coil-fed, however. PC, Senco, Bostich and most others make coil roofing nailers. Renting/borrowing one one for a day would be more cost effective. They are not called framing nailers since the nosepiece has to slip over the larger head of a roofing nail. It's split into two halves to perform that function.
On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 08:05:30 -0400, "Tim Schubach"

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Nope.

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Nope. Similar technology, but a different end result. Bostitch was a customer of mine and I worked with them on a roofing nailer project. There is a quite a bit of sophistication build into the roofing nail gun to set the nails perfectly every shot.
If I was doing a roof, I'd either rent one or buy one and sell it on eBay when I was done. You won't catch me doing it the old way. Matter of fact, you won't catch me doing a roof. Ed
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<snip>

Patriarch
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You *could* invest $150 in an OSHA safety harness. Not that looking like an idiot hanging from a piece of rope leading to the roof ridge if you slip is a total remedy over the alternative. ;-)
I'm not a pro, but am re-roofing and re-siding a large 3 story house without other human help. (In addition to much re-framing work due to termites and the original contractor's sub-standard non-code work.)
Ladder lifts, air nailers, and safety harnesses work wonders in lightening the work load - but it's still hard-ass work! Especially for a 46 year old who spent his younger years working technology jobs in air conditioned buildings, not on their roofs. But even after the investment in tools and time, I'm still money ahead, and have total control over the workmanship, which is a real consideration here in illegal laborer land... where job costs are high and quality is non-existant.
I use a Hitachi Coil Nailer, model NV45AB2, BTW. It works fine, but I find the air leakage at the trigger annoying... I have tried several, and they all do it when partially applying the trigger.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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<Greg G.> wrote in message

My comment was base on a one or two story house. You won't even get me to THINK about roofing a three story. Or siding above the first level.
I'm sure you will have a lot of satisfaction from a good job when you are done. Good luck with it.
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Edwin Pawlowski said:

So I guess that means you won't be over here next week when the hurricane winds and rain subside to help me out. ;-)
Darned, it's hard to find good help these days...
Greg G.
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<Greg G.> wrote in message

Sure I can help. I'll be the guy that puts the tools in the bucket that you can pull up to the top. Ed
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On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 03:44:01 -0400, Greg G. wrote:
|
|> |> |>> |><snip> |>> You won't catch me doing it the old way. |>> Matter of fact, you won't catch me doing a roof. |>> Ed |>> |>See, that's exactly my problem. There's no one to catch me. ;-)| |You *could* invest $150 in an OSHA safety harness. Not that looking |like an idiot hanging from a piece of rope leading to the roof ridge |if you slip is a total remedy over the alternative. ;-) | |I'm not a pro, but am re-roofing and re-siding a large 3 story house |without other human help. (In addition to much re-framing work due to |termites and the original contractor's sub-standard non-code work.) | |Ladder lifts, air nailers, and safety harnesses work wonders in |lightening the work load - but it's still hard-ass work! Especially |for a 46 year old who spent his younger years working technology jobs |in air conditioned buildings, not on their roofs. But even after the |investment in tools and time, I'm still money ahead, and have total |control over the workmanship, which is a real consideration here in |illegal laborer land... where job costs are high and quality is |non-existant.
Congratulations Greg.
I too did an addition to my house almost singlehandedly and I was 54 when I started. I did a 10' x 16' laundry/sewing room attached to the existing house and a 28' x 30' garage attached to that. Other than the concrete slab, stucco and hot-mopped roof, I did everything myself, while holding down an 8-5 EE job (+2 hours of commute time).
And I just worked off a 16' extension ladder. Hanging sheets of 1/2" OSB by yourself 16' above grade is a real thrill. I built an A-frame and used a screwed on cleat and ropes and pulleys to hoist the stuff while I tack nailed (by hand). When everything was in place, I rented a nailer and finished. Similar stunts were required to tip up framed wall sections (2X6s 12' tall), the 28' long 14" I-joists and the two 6x12 14' long beams used for garage door headers.
But I was young and foolish then (relatively speaking) [g]. Shortly after finished (nearly 3 years after pulling the permit) I learned of the untimely death of my first boss, who fell of his roof and died from a broken neck. I figure it could have been worse, he could have been paralyzed, or it could have been me.
This brings me closer to the point of writing this, as I'm not trying to blow my own horn, but to bring up another safety issue.
Since I'm also a radio amateur and have a 45' tower in my yard, I sometimes have to climb the damn thing. I will confess, I'm petrified, even at 20'. To me there is a big difference between being on a ladder propped against something solid and having *nothing* between you and the ground except air. So following Jean's death, I retired my old used lineman's climbing belt and bought a full body harness that I use with redundant safety ropes. And then I learned that the harness can kill you! See:
http://www.cdc.gov/elcosh/docs/d0500/d000568/d000568.html
So my real point is that working alone is always dangerous, regardless of how personally satisfying it might be and how many safety precautions we try to take.
Regards,
Wes
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4ax.com>:

Wow, thanks. I'm doing some work alone at 2 stories & was thinking of a belt. Now some pause to think further (or get some help)
Jerry
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On 15 Sep 2004 16:46:39 GMT, public@simoogledotcom (Jerry McCaffrey) wrote:
|4ax.com>: | |> And then I learned |>that the harness can kill you! See:|> |>http://www.cdc.gov/elcosh/docs/d0500/d000568/d000568.html |> | |Wow, thanks. I'm doing some work alone at 2 stories & was thinking of a |belt. Now some pause to think further (or get some help)
As a follow-up. I sent a copy of the article to my fire department. I live in a semi-rural area outside of Tucson but the FD is only about 4 miles away. In a cover letter I explained that I sometimes used one of these harnesses and wanted them to know how to rescue me if the time came.
I got a telephone call from one of the paramedics after he read the stuff. He said it was all very interesting but not to worry. It would probably take 15 minutes to get to my place after they were called, by which time I would probably already be dead. Comforting. [g]
Some time later I attended a public hearing at the FD. While there, I saw first hand what he was talking about. The alarm sounded and unlike what you see on TV these folks really take their sweet time about getting going. I estimate that it was about 10 minutes before they rolled.
Wes
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Wes Stewart said:

<snip of construction story>
Well, you've got me beat! That's too many hours of labor for me... I do, however, like to come up with task solving solutions to make a job easier.

Wow - that was an interesting read. I had never considered this possibility, although I DO (in my eternal paranoia) constantly keep the lines tied off so that a slip would result in catching the fall BEFORE going over the edge... just to save myself from the embarassment factor. ;-)

Good advice - but rest assured, I don't go out there without the better half being within earshot. When I said that I worked alone, I meant that I did the physical labor, not that I was totally alone.
Thanks for the heads up!
Greg G.
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