Framing Nailer - Round or Clipped Head?

Guys,
I'm getting ready to build a railing on a new deck, and want to get a framing nailer. It appears that I have to make a choice between a round head and clipped head nailer.
What are the pro's and con's of each style? Is there one that's favored over the other, for general nailing. For this project I'll be toe nailing the horizontal railing members (2x4) to the 4x4 posts. I'm assuming the clipped head nailer will leave a smaller nail hole. Does that also mean it doesn't provide as much holding power?
TIA,
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Round head claims to have more holding power but clipped head holds more nails per strip which is important to someone who is making his living with the gun. Clipped head nails are usually cheaper which is also important. IMO I would look instead for which gun feels good to you as far as weight and handling. Also consider the availability of service and parts. Price tag is also something to consider. If you are just going to be a casual user just about any gun will be adequate.
Both nails are going to have sufficient holding power for most applications. As far as installing a rail to a deck I would say that a screw would work best. Especially if your fastener is going into end grain. Also, a normal framing nail will corrode away before the wood needs to be replaced.
If you just want a new toy, buy a self feeding screw gun for this application. If you just want a framing nailer, buy it but still use screws (stainless or non-corrosive coated) for your deck railing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've used both, and when I buy one it'll be the clipped head variety. A clipped head nailer will hold the same number of nails with a shorter magazine, which makes it much easier to use. The big plus of the round head is that the finished product looks a little better (but only to you, because nobody else will look that close).
KB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have to agree with a previous post. Why would you use nails?? I have nail guns but my deck is held together with screws. You can use a corded or cordless drill with a screw bit or an actual screw gun. Much more holding power and will last longer.IMHO
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not that you're framing a home or something like that, but local building codes may restrict the use of clipped head nails in residential construction. (I know, you're building a deck.)
JHeyen wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I seem to recall that at least in some areas of the country the full head nail is required for framing use by code.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a clipped head nailer from Senco (Frame Pro 601) that can use round head nails...even though there is no restrictions in my area about clipped v. round head. The round head nails I have are, of course, from Senco for the nailer. They don't cost any more than the clipped nails either.
JHeyen wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JHeyen said:

First, a clipped head nail has the same diameter head as a round head nail, only the edge is "clipped" - like a letter D. This generally means the magazine holds more nails for a given length. Although some building codes, notably California and Florida, restrict the use of clipped head nails, independent studies have show the heads have almost the same holding power. It seems the bigger problem is pullout in high winds - which can be minimized by using coated and/or ring-shank nails.
This leads to my next question - why on earth would you use nails anywhere on a deck. Screws are far superior - use galvanized or stainless steel. Non hot-dipped galvanized steel nails should not be used on pressure treated lumber or in an exposed location either.
FWIW,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.