Framing Nailer question

I'm looking to purchase a Framing Nailer for a few jobs around the house like: building a shed, a fence, dog house and would like some clarification. I have seen 34, 28 and 21 degree nailers an was wondering if there are any great advantage of getting one over the others or is it just a matter of personal preference? I dont think I'll be nailing in any tight spaces. Is there any cost of supplies benefit in getting one degree over another?
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snipped-for-privacy@wachovia.com wrote:

Hardly a "woodworking" question, more appropriate for alt.home.repair or similar, but...
IMO no real difference other than the minor difference in accessibility. I'd look for one that seems to have a wide interchangeability w/ others for what it will use and I recommend full round head over clipped head simply as being stronger -- heads and shank diameters are small relative to regular common nails anyway, typically.
Also, look for the capability to drive nails as large as you thing you may need -- some of the less expensive scrimp on the side of shorter.
--


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You are correct. I bought the round head nailer , though, and have occasionally regretted it. The clipped head nails are less expensive and more commonly available. My nailer has been reliable but I have occasionally have problems which might be solved by the clipped nails. I have been told that the clipped nails feed better with fewer misfires.
They are strong enough, it seems, since everone I know but me has the clipped head nailer. I have been told that the round head nails are required in some places where they have hurricanes and the like. They are not required in Minnesota. If I were buying again I would go for the clipped head style.
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I have one of each - Paslode F350S for 34 degree nails (paper collation, clipped head) and Hitachi NR83A (21 degree, round head). Paslode also makes Roundrive nails that are offset full round head nails at 34 degree paper collation. The Paslode nails are a bit more expensive but they are a quality fastener.
Doing it again, I would go with the      Hitachi NR90AD Clipped Head 2-Inch to 3-1/2-Inch Framing Nailer which is very light. They have been out long enough now that refurbed units should be available.
On Wed, 13 Jun 2007 10:12:07 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@wachovia.com wrote:

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Look for a "full head" nailer that will drive up to the largest nail that you think you might use. Cheaper ones use clipped head nails and don't drive the longest nails. Also look for one that will drive the nails that are easiest to find in your area. Some require special nails that are hard to find. The biggest brand names are the ones that are usually easiest to find nails and parts for. Bostitch, Accuset, Paslode, Porter-Cable, DeWalt are the brands that seem to fit this category around here. I have Porter-Cable and Bostitch and have no complaints.
Charley

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snipped-for-privacy@wachovia.com opin'd thus:

I was needing a nailer for similar uses, and to accommodate all the nailing jobs around the place except for finishing and brad nailing, I got a Senco palm nailer like this one:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
It's not as fast as a specialized framing or roofing nailer 'cause you need to feed each nail by hand, but it will drive any nail from 5d to 16d (and larger with different heads) and it's inexpensive (a big plus for a cheap bastard like me ;^) I've used mine for framing the walls and making roof trusses for my shed and I was quite pleased with the tool . . . .
--
I wish the buck stopped here; I could use a few

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