Framing Lumber

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In that era they probably went to the landfill. Today companies are more aware of the value in scrap, and will sell anything that's valuable enough to justify the effort.
John
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On 7/25/2016 5:15 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Yes, but they will also destroy defective product so it cannot be sold at the local flea market for pennies and returned to a legitimate store for full refund.
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"John McCoy" wrote in message

In that era they probably went to the landfill. Today companies are more aware of the value in scrap, and will sell anything that's valuable enough to justify the effort.
Working in accounting for much of my tenure I saw many a bill for truckloads of used rail ties, usually $1.50/each.
Dave in SoTex
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Those get incinerated today, they are toxic waste (much to the annoyance of the railroads, who have to collect them up and haul them off, instead of selling them where they happen to be taken up).
John
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On 7/27/2016 9:24 AM, John McCoy wrote:

That probably depends on where you live, in Houston you can often find RR ties at lumber yards.
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Possibly if they've been in the ground long enough for the creosote to leach out (or they weren't treated to begin with). Most of Texas is pretty dry, so there's likely a supply of ancient ties which isn't the case in wetter parts of the country.
In general, tho, used ties are collected and incinerated. As I said, this is a great annoyance to the railroads (back when I worked w/ railroad folk, it was one of the hot button issues they liked to complain about).
John
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Yes, they are pretty much clean to handle with a trace of creosote. They still last for decades as landscape timbers.
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The summer of 1969 I got summer work as a laborer at Southern Pacific's creosote plant located on the west end of Houston's Englewood Yard, practically under Lockwood Drive just north of I-10. Hottest damn summer I can remember often topping 100 degs. Laborer often meant stickering green ties for air drying, essentially building "towers" of stickered, cross-stacked ties that involved a fork lift as well as a couple of us laborers atop the growing stack to position and space those ties with three-foot long hand hooks. You sweated constantly which meant you likely were wiping your face with the back of your gloved hand which meant you couldn't avoid imparting some of those chemicals on and around your face. My face soon began peeling in various places and continued to do so all that summer. And, we handled treated bridge and switch ties using the hand hooks to drag those along runners then bundling them [usually two over two] and banding them for shipping readiness. That facility is long gone now. When I left the railroad in 1994 most of Southern Pacific's treated ties came from the Kerr McGee plant in Texarkana. I still haven't figured out why the U.S. rail industry has never began converting to concrete ties as has most of Europe.
Dave in SoTex
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wrote:

They have a cheaper alternative, plastic ties from recycled plastic waste.
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You haven't looked at a railroad recently. Most mainline trackage is concrete ties now, and has been for probably 20 years. Lightly used tracks are still wood because it's cheaper to install than concrete.

Recycled plastic ties have been tried. They've had problems with fastners creeping and other issues. They're also more expensive than wood. Mostly they're used in wet places where wood ties don't last as long (especially places were replacing ties is difficult, like in tunnels).
John
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On 7/29/2016 8:40 AM, Dave in SoTex wrote:

YEAH! I spent most of the summer of 1969 in Harrah OK. I recall as kids sitting under the patio cover and watching the thermometer reach 110 degrees F. We spent a lot of time in the cellar to stay cool.

Actually somewhere near Wharton TX there are concrete RR ties being used.
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"John McCoy" wrote in message >> Working in accounting for much of my tenure I saw many a bill for

In New York ties (and telephone poles) can only be reused for industrial purposes... i.e., as ties or telephone poles. These items cannot be repurposed for landscaping, bulkheads, parking lot posts, or anything else.
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On Monday, July 25, 2016 at 5:15:17 PM UTC-4, John McCoy wrote:

About 8 years ago our offices moved from a downtown building to an office park in the suburbs.
The "Mahogany Row" furniture (72" glass topped desks, 72" credenzas, matching bookcases, etc.) was showing its age, so it was announced that any employee that wanted the furniture from their own office, and had the means to move it themselves, could take it home.
Many of us ended up with some pretty decent looking home offices. In some cases, the employees didn't want their furniture, but "deals were made". They came in on the moving day and with help from other employees, took their furniture "home". Once the furniture left the building, management didn't care who actually ended up with it, it just had to be removed by the employee that it was assigned to. One guy furnished home offices for himself and 2 of his sons.
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wrote:

Occaisionally we can by SYP dimensional lumber up here - sometimes in pressure treated. The precut studs up here are virtually all low end SPF
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On 7/15/2016 7:46 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

There is the answer. On a jobsite that is $50 or so.
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On 7/16/2016 6:43 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Bingo ... or more in this day and age.
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On 7/15/2016 6:46 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

That circumstance is always subject to change upon delivery of the next pallet off the boxcar to the lumber dealer ... might be the other way around on the next boxcar load.

Trust me, someone is ... guaranteed.
It doesn't happen often, mainly for the reasons below, but I have been known to refuse a load of material that was not up to my standards for the purpose for which it was purchased.
Benefit of having a long standing _credit_ account with one of the biggest lumber yards in this area; and their/my sales rep, with whom I've been dealing for 15 years, is well aware that I make it a point to personally inspect and sign off on every delivery, before it is unloaded.
Only took a time or two to get some personal involvement before it left the yard ... but they know I'm gonna exercise a bit of judgement/provide some wiggle room ... nothing is perfect, but it might be perfect enough, providing you know how to handle less than perfect material and and make it work without detriment to the project. ;)
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