Forrest WWII

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hell I thought the same thing. after i wasted about the same amount on a couple of high quality rip blades that the forrest blew away I felt a bit silly. when a 30t forrest blade out rips two different 20t rip blades (a cmt and a good brand) that says something. I can rip faster and cleaner with the forrest blade.
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On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 07:01:14 -0700, Jane & David

But have you ever used a planer blade, Dave?
Have a nice week...
Trent
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have YOU ever used a WWII?? (that's my rhetorical question for the day) <g>
dave
"Trent" wrote:

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I have used the Craftsman Hollow Ground Planer blades. They are a flash in the pan and then they get dull. Basically they are ground out thinner between the arbor hole and the teeth. They rub less against the wood. If your hollow planer blades cut better than your other blades, your saw is probably not set up correctly. With a properly set up saw, the wood should not rub the sides of any blade that you may be using.
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On Sun, 03 Aug 2003 01:14:25 GMT, "Doug Winterburn"

So...am I understanding you correctly?...
The hgp blade cuts just as well as a Freud?...as long as its sharp?
If so, I'll keep goin' the way I am. I have no problem swapping a little elbow grease on my end with sharpening for that green stuff that's hard to come by! lol
Do you think Freud is better than a Forrest? I'm not sure I've ever seen a Forrest in my area. I'm gonna start payin' attention to blades, I guess.
Thanks for the info.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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Not in my opionion.

Not in my opinion.

Rockler and Woodcraft sell them.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Save the baby humans - stop partial-birth abortion NOW
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Not in our neck of the woods. Woodcraft doesn't carry Forrest blades.

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They do here in Houston ... but it's hit and miss whether you'll find the 40 tooth 1/8" WWII actually in stock.
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Buy the Forrest form 3D sales. Shipping in only a couple of days and they are normally the cheapest. I bought a reg. kerf 40 tooth WWII about 3 weeks ago for $101 delivered.

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Yep, that's where I bought the Chopmaster from and I have no complaints with them. They'll be getting my business again.
Leon wrote:

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On Sun, 03 Aug 2003 20:14:07 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Any idea who currently makes the Craftsman blades?
Have a nice week...
Trent
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Vermont American.

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It's I. Wan Der Hu
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wrote:

Thanks for the offer, Ed.
Sorry if I misled you and others, Ed...but I do have a carbide blade...that I use on a regular basis. Actually, I have 2 of them...combo blades. They came with my $79 table saw. The blades and the saw are made by ProTech...Lowe's...and, to be honest, I never heard of the company before then.
But I was getting wobbly cuts...and never really had a reason to care...since I was doing only rough-in work. Then I decided to build my first furniture project...a microwave cabinet which I recently finished. It came out really well for my first project...but the planer blade made a big difference in the quality of the work. And I bought a steel blade...Sears...mainly 'cause I'm cheap...and I sharpen them myself.
I'm guessing that the Forrest blades and all the other quality blades only come in carbide now...or better. And I understand that they last longer before going dull.
But I guess I haven't seen where one actually cuts better...when new...than the other. I guess I WON'T see that...until I buy one once and try for myself.
Thanks for all the info.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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I only crosscut on my SCMS. but the difference and accuracy between my freud 80t high end chopsaw blade and the forrest chopmaster is noticeable. the accuracy is the big difference. no real flex in the forrest. Plus it cuts faster too. only a 30 price difference i think.
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Zillions. :-)

They *are* good blades, especially for the price. But there is also a night-and-day difference between those, and a Forrest WWII.

Mostly a case of different people having different preferences, I guess. I'd rather spend my time cutting wood than sharpening blades. I also like the fact that I don't have to take boards through the jointer prior to edge-gluing them. For me, the Forrest is a *major* time-saver, and to me, it's worth the extra money.

It's easy to say "I'm just gonna look, not buy". Sticking to it, once you've seen what's there, may be another matter. :-)
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Save the baby humans - stop partial-birth abortion NOW
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for me it's cheep. saves me time and improves my accuracy. saves having to run the fresh cut piece over my edge sander or getting a jointer. Plus it will save me sharpenings so it will be cheeper in the long run. My last rip blade lost a tooth. there goes another 40.00 down the drain.
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I have both. You must understand that there are more variables at work on a table saw than on a miter saw. The WWII has extremely low clearances between the teeth and the plate. So you have much less margin for error in terms of fence alignment, miter gauge alignment, proper feeding technique, etc. Pitch buildup on the blade will begin to cause problems a little sooner than it would on other blades. You also will more easily see the effects of twist and other imperfections in the wood while using the WWII. Now, having said all that, if your saw is properly set up and adjusted and you keep the blade clean, the WWII produces every bit the quality of cut as the Chopmaster. I've got two WWII's (one with a flat tooth profile), the Chopmaster, and the 8" Dado King and I wouldn't trade any of them.
Mike Fairleigh

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So you are saying the blade will show me the imperfections in the set up of my saw and techniques, making me a better wood worker. So much the better. :)
Why two WWII's? What is the difference between the flat tooth profile and the alternate bevel profile? Seems like either would give you a flat bottom in a cut that doesn't go all the way through the wood.

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No, while the standard ATB profile is needed to produce the clean crosscuts the WWII provides, it will leave an inverted "V" profile in the bottom of a kerf. For most applications this is not a problem but I like to use a flat-ground one for things like splines. A lot of people just use one of the outside plates from a stacked dado set for this purpose, but I like having a 10" version.
Mike Fairleigh
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