Formica.. need helpfixing a chip

I am building a sewing table for my wife. Her "shop" is adjacent to mine and I am always amused at all of the parallels between quilting and woodworking. He current table is small and poorly designed. The major limitation is that it is no big enough to support her work, and consequently, the weight of the workpiece (quilt) pulls itself away from the machine. The woodworking analogy is trying to cut a sheet of plywood on a modest table saw without infeed or outfeed tables.
So... I set out to make the sewing table with a nice big flat slick surface. The design that I came up with is a hybrid. The top, is kitchen-counter-like (formica on MDF w/ maple perimeter and apron). This top rests on a frame an pannel bank of drawers on one end, and just a pair of legs on the other.
The apron/perimeter assembly was biscuited to the already formica-laminated mdf. When clamping this together, I snapped a chip out fo the formica about 1.25"x .5". Gluing back in the chip will not work, as it was apparently slightly deformed on exit and it will not sit perfectly flat. (see bad photo on ABPF).
I am wondering if there is a something like a pigmented apoxy that could be poured into the recess and scraped level? Since the formica is a matte white, a decent color match is probably doable.
IU know this is not going to be perfect and that's OK as this is not intendeded to be furniture-grade work (think really nice outfeed table).
Ideas?
Steve
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[...]

Araldite (http://www.araldite.com ) makes epoxy that is white all by itself, matte it will become by sanding with not a too fine grit.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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assembly was biscuited to the already formica-laminated

about
photo
First of all, I'll qualify myself with "I do this for a living". When this happens to me, my profit level goes down because I have to order a new piece of laminate and start over. It's unfortunate, but it does happen. Hope this helps. SH
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this
piece
I forgot to add, I have lots of mistakes for sale ;-) SH
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You might try sanding the bottom of the piece, putting a slurry of yellow glue and sawdust into the hole, and pressing the piece into place. Hopefully you can make the patch level. Clean of the squeeze out before it gets too hard. Buena suerte.     mahalo,     jo4hn
Stephen Meier wrote:

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On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 04:40:35 -0500, "Stephen Meier"

Now is the time to practice your inlay skills, Stephen. Route out the area to a pattern of your choice (that fits the hole) so it's flat. Now cut and glue in some replacement pieces of various colors. She'll love it.
It's not a problem, it's a design enhancement.
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On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 04:40:35 -0500, "Stephen Meier"

if its on the edge [i cant tell from the photo] maybe you could rout a profile on the edge cutting away the chiped part. a round over set deep or a beveling bit come to mind.if its on a corner you could miter the corners. if it is inset with the maple you could rout a chanel all the way around with a template and a strait cutter and inlay another type of wood for contrast. hiding it is much cheeper and easier than fixing it or buying more laminate. skeez
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Steve, Sorry to say but you are SOL. There is no way to make an accepable patch with a reasonable effort. I suggest that rather than making it over you first try to rip 2" off and re apply the edge. Even this may take longer than just making a new top. Personally i would start over as it would be faster and only slightly more expensive.
Mike
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