Formaldehyde Free Plywood at HD

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Although I haven't been there in a while, I noticed yesterday that Home Depot is carrying "Formaldehyde-free" plywood now (by Columbia Forest Products). I thought that $39.95 for a 3/4" 4' by 8' sheet was quite fair based on the prices of similar Formaldehyde-free materials I have seen described (and availability is another thing altogether..). My previously-discussed sensitivity to formaldehyde makes living or working with the "ordinary stuff " impractical. If this stuff lives up to my expectations, if may re-open doors that I perceived were shut-off to me! I am hopeful! : ) For $20 they will provide me with a pickup truck for 75 minutes. Question: Can I, with a partner, safely cut a full sheet in half on a 30" table saw (without risking kickback)?
Bill
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wrote:

You can probably do it without a partner if you go about it the right way. However, kickbacks can happen even when the safest precautions have been taken.
That said you can use one of more of the following methods:
1) Don't feed the plywood from right behind it where a kickback might throw the wood.
2) Have a properly working splitter on the tablesaw. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pQ151&cat=1,41080,51225&ap=1
3a) Use kickback pawls on the tablesaw.
3b) Use antikickback rollers on the wood when feeding the wood. http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2003794/17799/Anti-Kickback-Safety-Roller--Yellow---Clockwise.aspx
3c) Use featherboards on the top of the plywood sheet to hold it down. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pU999&cat=1,42363,42356
4) Use infeed and outfeed tables or supports for cutting (or the help of a partner)
5) Cut the plywood in half off the tablesaw (handsaw, jigsaw, powersaw) and then cut the halves to size on the tablesaw.
I'm sure there's a few more safety precautions you can take, but these above should get you started.
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http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2003794/17799/Anti-Kickback-Safety-Roller--Yellow---Clockwise.aspx
#5 is probably the best. Couple sheets of foam on the floor or driveway, 100" straight edge and a skill saw.
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wrote:

Always wondered about that since I've never tried it. Won't the skill saw kick up a bunch of foam sheet pieces that stick to everything because of static electricity? It alway drives me nuts trying to dispose of static filled foam peanuts from delivery packages.
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On Mon, 08 Feb 2010 03:54:56 -0500, Upscale wrote:

Nope. Not if you mean the construction foam, the pink or blue stuff. I refloored a 10'X20' porch with plywood cut just that way. Set the saw so it only goes into the foam 1/2" or less.
--
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wrote:

Definitely the pink or blue foam. In a pinch the beaded stuff is ok, but there is the mess. I just always found it simpler to 'rip' a sheet of plywood this way. That said, if the cut is within safe reaching distance, I prefer to lay the sheet on saw horses rather than wrestle it onto the table saw or crawl on it on the floor.
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On Mon, 8 Feb 2010 17:48:05 +0000 (UTC), the infamous Larry Blanchard

Lay a piece of pipe over the foam, step on it, and create a void where the saw blade won't cut foam. Also, use a shallow cutting depth, good side down for the ply, and tape the back. Remove the tape toward the cut edge so it doesn't splinter.
-- In order that people may be happy in their work, these three things are needed: They must be fit for it. They must not do too much of it. And they must have a sense of success in it. -- John Ruskin, Pre-Raphaelitism, 1850
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The Home Depots around here will do one or two cuts free. I have them rough cut the sheet into a couple of pieces and do the final cutting at home. Safer for me and easier to transport.
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Bill wrote:

Yes. Especially when following normal precautions.
In addition, it would require a really powerful saw to throw half a sheet of 3/4" plywood instead of:
a) Cutting into the stock, or b) Stalling the motor
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On 2/8/2010 6:33 AM, HeyBub wrote:

A 3HP cabinet saw will kickback a half sheet of 3/4" ply with enough force to make you stop talk politics, if only momentarily. ;)
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We need a "like" button on usenet. :-)
Luigi
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

entire email using those two buttons with and occasional word interspersed now and then.
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On 2/8/2010 12:47 AM, Bill wrote:

Yeps, you definitely haven't been there for a while. Columbia Forest Products has been supplying Home Depot with Formaldehyde free plywood since 2005. ;)
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Swingman wrote:

The Formaldehyde Departme..,oops I mean the Eco-friendly Fabricated Building Materials departments is an area I have tended to avoid ; ) I've been carefully inching my way back since I bought a house. I wore a dust mask at the Woodworkers Show this year and had no problems (unlike the previous 2 years).
Bill
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on most contractor's saws (120v) minor. Just keep out of the way and use outfeed rollers or table, along with something at the side. When I had a shop, I built a little 12X30" table just the height of the TS and kept it to the left of the TS. A couple shelves in the table really added to its utility.
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This reminds me of something I saw in the past year or so. Plan for a cart for moving plywood sheets. Cart - like hand cart - swung the sheet up parallel to the floor and morphed into an infeed table.
Shopnotes?
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wrote:

Or perhaps, a tablesaw panel lifter. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pb580&cat=1,41080,51225&ap=1
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That's something like it, but the one I saw had a couple wheels for rolling the panel to the saw.
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wrote:

Think I remember the cart you're referring to. It was hinged at both ends at 2' where the middle of a 4x8 sheet of wood would sit in the cart. One would then swing the 4x8 sheet parallel to the ground and then slide it onto a flat surface or a table saw for example.
Someone will post the link to it.
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Sounds like.

I searched, but didn't find anything close.
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