form fitting foam?

Hey all, I've got a friend who has a glass chess set and would like me to make a box to hold it. Simple enough. He only requested felt inside, but I thought it'd be nice if I could somehow form the interior to fit the pieces better. I don't want to have to cut out shapes for them either. Is there there something that I could push the pieces into that would form around them and still look decent? Thanks for any help!
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Ping Kevin Wilcox, and ask him how he accomplished it, since I just saw a post of his on ABPW dated yesterday of a beautiful chess board with the glass pieces recessed into the felted drawer. Very cool idea. Check it out if your ISP carries the group.
-- Brian www.wood-workers.com/users/lavoie

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In his post of the pics, he said he used "Durham water putty and Donher's flocking material" Whatever that stuff is. Sound's like Hobby-Lobby kind of stuff.
Bob

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On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 06:56:10 GMT, "Bob Davis"

the durham's is kinda like fixall but denser. good stuff.
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote in wrote:

You get it at plumbing shops and some better hardawre stores. It comes as a powder and you add water to make a slurry, you can then mold it and it will set up pretty hard.
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How about that expanding polyurethane sold as "Great Stuff" or similar? Wax for mold release and give 'er a try.

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I'm the one Brian referenced. I used Durhams Rock Hard Water Putty that I bought at Home Depot (see www.waterputty.com ) in the same section as drywall repair and wood putty. It's a powder that you add water to. It took me a few tries until I got the consistency right, but it worked very well when I made it thin enough to be self-levelling but thick enough to keep the pieces from rolling around.
Once that stuff cured (only takes an hour or so) I pried out the pieces and sanded some of the rough edges. Then I applied a "flocking" material that I got at Woodcraft. I'd never done it before, but it worked very well. First you apply a colored adhesive with a brush or roller, then you shake on 1/32" long colored rayon fibers. After the adhesive cures (about a day) you shake off the excess fibers, and voila, instant felt!
I'm very pleased with the results, and the cost was very reasonable, I thought.
In case you're wondering, I did not use any release agent on the pieces. The chess set I bought had smooth glass pieces and frosted glass pieces. I used only the smooth glass pieces, and was able to scrape the putty off the pieces very easily. The stuff does seem to stick to anything with a texture to it which is why I didn't use the frosted glass pieces.
Good luck, Kevin
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On 22 Dec 2003 19:54:31 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (werlax) wrote:

Don't form fit it - they're an absolute pain to use.
I'd make segmented boxes from foam, with a base-shaped recess at the bottom and some squeeze vertically (chessman axis) above. Leave gaps around the side so you can get hold of the chessman. You could make this with vertical slabs of plastazote foam (any craft shop), stencil cut around the base cutout - all the rest is straight lines.
Slip some masonite into the dividers for strength (if you need it) and a slip of plastazote over the horizontal divider to neaten the visible edges.
-- Klein bottle for rent. Apply within.
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