Forgive me for I have sinned

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While not a ww tool, I just bought a Sony DSC-P32 at wally world for ~ 200 bucks yesterday.. It isn't the camera I want, the ones I want start in at about 800 bucks and because of that I haven't bought one to replace my Cannon F1 (film camera).
If it will do the job within it's limitations and remove a limitation from what you are trying to do than your little saw will earn it's keep.
The first pic's were of my horizontal band mill :) (ww content)
Some day I will have my dream camera and I will still have a knockabout camera that I won't cry about if it gets lost/damaged/stolen.
Wes
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Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Gee Tee EYE EYE dot COM
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About 10 or 20 years ago (I don't know, it's been awhile) I bought a little Sears benchtop table saw. Not as light as you describe, but these were still fairly new then. I've been dreaming of replacing that saw ever since, but I have built bookcases, birdfeeders, fences, display cases, and last Summer a whole 8' by 19' green house using that little table saw. The greenhouse project involved cutting dadoes down the length of lots of 2X4 red cedar. Most pieces needed a dado on two sides. It took a little longer to do it that if I had a contractor's saw (or even a real cabinet saw), but I was careful with the setup and took my time and it got done. I found the blade height adjustment would slip if I tried to feed stock too fast.
I am now planning to reward myself with a Ryobi BT3100 for Christmas. Although I sometimes thing a drill press and/or band saw might be better. My wife seems to like the idea of a drill press for some unkown reason. She has her own hobbies, and I'm almost afraid to find out what she is thinking of doing with a drill press . . . ;-)
Anyway, don't talk yourself into hating the little saw. Figure out how to get the most out of it and you will be much happier. You will also appreciate your next saw all that much more.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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There is a lot of wisdom in picking up that little saw. By getting it now, and getting some work done on it you may find that it does all that you need from a saw (at least for now) and lets you move onto something else. On the other hand, it could prove to be entirely inadequate, but teach you what you will need to look for on your next one. It's pretty bad when you spend a ton of money on a tool and find out that you needed a feature that it can't have.
I would bet that you find that the little saw will pull its own weight even after you get the good one.
Michael

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