For those of you with garage workshops...

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How do you handle the problem of rust? If I pull my car into the garage after it has been out in the rain, or covered with snow and salt, it's going to really do a number on my tools. Not only my table saw, jointer, etc, but also the smaller hand tools like chisels and planes. Just putting a dehumidifier isn't going to do much good with a wet car right next to everything.
Thanks
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Heard of many folks putting Silica bags in the drawers with their handtools.

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D Steck wrote:

they'd need a pretty large bag and drawer to hold a table saw. :)
Dave
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My shop is currently in a very damp basement, even with a dehumidifier. I recently bought a silica gel box (Cabelas, http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat20712&id 05567220673a&navCount=5&podId05567&parentIdΚt20799&navAction=push&catalogCode=IF&rid=&parentType=index&indexIdΚt20799&hasJS=true ) I put this in a rubbermaid tub with the hand tools I really care about, and it seems to work well. I haven't had it for a long time, and it wouldn't help at all with the big power tools, but it might be something to consider. Andy
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My shop is in the garage and the way that I handled it is that I built a partition wall seperating my shop from where a car might go, put a ceiling in it insulated the entire thing and run a window AC unit 24/7. Perhaps overkill on the construction and a bit expensive for the AC but none of my tools show any sign of rust. It is worth it to me as I don't want to waste precious shop time doing rust remediation on my tools. I also justify it in my mid as the shop is about the same temp / humidity as the house where the stuff I build will eventually be deployed so - in theory - moisture takeup on the wood should be somewhat consistent between environments.
My dad's shop is in what amounts to a detached garage and is in the woods. He only runs the AC when he is in there and he is CONSTANTLY fighting the rust problem.
Philly metro BTW so humidity is a real problem.
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The AC is the problem. He should either leave the AC on or off to help prevent the rust. Its the drastic temperature change that causes moisture in the air to condense on his tools.
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pduck wrote:

leave the cars outside?? :) I haven't parked a car in my garage shop for over 3 years. The cars are doing fine. They don't rust outside and my shop doesn't get "disturbed". Then again, I don't live in snow country. I thought most snow country homes had basements. I've considered moving to the midwest and taking over an entire basement (1,500 square feet) for my next shop. that would be so cool to have plenty of room for stock. I could retire some of the equipment's mobile stands with that much room. Each "toy" could stay put in a shop that large. sigh...
Dave
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I DO live in snow country and neither my wife's nor my car come inside the house (needless to say the kids' cars don't either). The wife was less than pleased by that when we contemplated purchasing the current home and she thought she might get to use the garage, but after we talked and she accepted that she got a dining room, a living room, 3 bathrooms and virtually the entire walk-in closet and all I got from the new house was a little bit bigger garage shop, she was OK with it.
Dave Hall
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Dave Hall wrote:

ah, the art of compromise! :)
Dave
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Dave Hall wrote:

maybe get her one of those canvas car awnings to park under. not as much protection as a garage, but better than nothing. something like: <http://www.centraltarp.com/html/shelters_0.html
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Oh sure, you only think you'd get the entire basement!!!! I get a little corner of an unfinished basement. SWMBO wants it finished and we are currently in negotiation on how much of it I get for the shop!!!
If you ever do move, make sure you get a basement with at least 9' ceilings.
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D Steck wrote:

I'm HOPING I'd get the whole basement! :) Having discussed it at length with SWMBO, it appears I would snag the entire basement if we ever move to a house similar to the one we spent several days looking at in KS. The ceilings were 9'. I wouldn't want less if I plan on putting a shop into one. Lower than that would be a deal breaker.
Dave
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My suggestion, do NOT strive for a basement workshop. Invariable, it's difficult to move supplies in an out of the basement, even if the stairway is in the garage. If you have the laundry facilities in the basement, dust (even with a good dust collector) will prove to be an insurmountable problem. The noise from power tools, especially pneumatic nailers, can generate enormous complaints from the rest of the family. But the biggie, from my experience is finishing procedures. Varnishes, even the new latex paints, still have an odors that will invariable seep to the rest of the home and only then will you find out that every single person in your household has asthma, bronchial or acute respiratory failure, and if you open up one more can, you will be charged under the domestic violence laws.
Where in Kansas? James, north central Kansas.
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Amused wrote:

Thanks for the info, James.
Hmmm...I have an attached garage that I do HVLP spraying. I sometimes smell a bit of the sprayed product inside the house, but it isn't objectionable often or bad enough to be concerned. I would be concerned if spraying inside a basement would worsen the problem.
I'd only get a walk-out basement for ease of bringing in supplies and taking out projects. No way I'd consider just stairs!
"Family" is just me and the missus. (Besides visitors--but I'd skip the woodworking if someone's visiting for a few days)
The house we considered has a laundry room behind the garage, on the main floor. Beats hauling laundry up and down the basement stairs.
My wife's computer/sewing room's right next to the shop. She has said the shop noise doesn't intrude. Plus, she knows what it's like to live with a shop right under her bedroom, during a previous "life". I was watching PBS last night--60's music--while she was sleeping soundly beside me in the bedroom. Lights and TV noise don't wake her up. The neighbors fricking barking dogs do (wake her), but they have all recently gotten barking collars, which WORK, thank God!
I'm concerned about the humidity level (with a/c from the central unit) in a basement, even barring a water seepage problem in the basement. Do you know the humidity level of your basement and of the main living quarters? I know it can get pretty humid in the midwest. I spent 3 years in MO. Is a basement always going to be inherently more humid than the upper stories, even with an a/c register always open in the basement?
oh, our washer and drier are in my garage shop and I've yet to see a problem. What EXACTLY is the problem with the laundry being done in the shop area? Our drier vents outside. I don't like it when hot water is being used in the washer if I'm about to do finishing, but other than that, the 2 functions have coexisted fine ever since I started woodworking in the shop.
Lenexa or vicinity.
Dave
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Think of a cold winter day. While it is true that inside air and outside air are eventually exchanged, there still will be some overlap and any significant odor in the basement will eventually be circulated throughout the house, especially in the forced air system your most likely to find in eastern Kansas.

That's a point, but just to play devil's avocate, how are go to get to that walkout basement, unless you find one with basement garages. Think of having to drive your truck in the backyard with some frequency. I'm sure you can find exactly what you're looking for, but it's likely to take some looking.

Sure does.

From my experience, humidity just isn't a problem. Since it's raining outside, right now, I'm sure the humidity level in my garage/shop is right at 100%. BTW, it's been so hot lately, I bought a used window air conditioner ($15 gloat) and stuck it in a garage window. Works like a champ. Even when outside tempertures peaked at over 100 degrees, this summer, the window unit would keep the inside of the workshop in the low 80's. Not perfect, but certainly acceptable. (At that air conditioner spat out a stead stream of water, too).
Note: I moved two months, ago. We used the "pods", that were stored in the open for ten days. I had tools, (hacksaw frames, coping saw frames, etc) that rusted for the first time in 25 years. Some beyond salvation, unless I want to spend hours with a wire brush. The "pods", sitting in a storage lot, heated up to very high tempertures during the day, then rapidly cooled probably 60 or 70 degrees, when the sun went down. There was condesation damage on more than just my tools. (This is, apparently a problem with moving vans, too, if the move is not directly from house to house.)
If, I was going to do it again, I swear I'd call an auctioneer and sell out everything except the absolutely irreplaceable items and start all over again in the new location.

I had a shop in the basement. I even install special wiring. (Man-oh-man, it was slick). But even with a dust collector, there was still a fine coating of dust in the laundry room and on clothes that my wife would ocassionaly decide couldn't go into the dryer. Eventually, the shop migrated half of a double car garage, and then very gradually, took over the whole garage.

We, sold out and moved from western Shawnee, just two months, ago. Johnson County's ever-esculating property taxes are just not condusive to a genteel retirement.

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I'm not married, so my entire basement is my shop. Well, other than utility room, storage room, and bathroom. Of course, it has been 4 winters now and the shop isn't done yet. Should be done this winter.
I still want to build a real shop in the backyard as I have to remove my egress window to get any sheet goods or anything large into the shop.

That is going to be hard to find. I wanted a 13 course basement, but water problems prevented the basement from going that deep.
Brian Elfert
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In that case, the entire HOUSE can be your shop. Must be handy to have a table saw in the living room, right next to the recliner.
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pduck wrote: How do you handle the problem of rust? I moved from Michigan to Arizona.. Tom
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Ah, one of the benefits we enjoy down here in New Mexico. The humidity is so low, rust is never a problem.
My father-in-law lived in this house for 50+ years. After he died, as I was going through his old tools, I was amazed to see how well preserved they were in his garage.
Back in New Jersey, I used silica, rust preventors, WD40 ... anything I could get my hands on to combat the onset of rust.
And usually, I would lose the battle.
Jack
pduck wrote:

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pduck wrote:

Constant use and a lot of wiping and fondling of the tools... :-)

-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.” George Bernard Shaw
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